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The Milk Frothing Guide
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claye
Senior Member


Joined: 2 Nov 2005
Posts: 14
Location: Australia
Expertise: I live coffee

Espresso: saeco SE
Grinder: Mazzer Luigie
Posted Wed Nov 2, 2005, 9:22pm
Subject: Re: The Milk Frothing Guide
 

Hello all
I thought it was great. It helped in my cafe alot thanks Aarin
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TheCoffeeKids
Senior Member
TheCoffeeKids
Joined: 31 Jan 2006
Posts: 43
Location: Australia
Posted Fri Feb 3, 2006, 3:29am
Subject: Re: The Milk Frothing Guide
 

This is exellent, keep them coming CoffeeGeek.
All you need now is a step by step guide with pictures and/or videos on how to make latte art (as in a whole section for each kind e.g. a page full of info, pics etc just on how to make a heart).

 
Charlie...
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Panoula
Senior Member


Joined: 1 Jun 2006
Posts: 1
Location: US
Expertise: Just starting

Posted Fri Jun 2, 2006, 9:03am
Subject: Re: The Milk Frothing Guide
 

Aaron,
Thanks for the well written article. The step by step instructions and pictures have helped clear things up for me, a true beginner. I just bought my first espresso machine, Bezzera BZ02S, after much reading and researching on several websites. (Are you familiar with the machine?) After a week of playing around with my new toy, over 2 pounds of coffee and 2 gallons of milk, I'm still feeling frustrated with my frothing ability. My husband was able to produce pretty decent foam with it, but I feel the steam tip is too powerful and the wand itself is too short. Is it possible for the wand to be too short? Should I buy a replacement steam tip to ease my frustration or do I just keep practicing? I've written to 1st Line Equipment with these questions and after a week have not heard back so I could really use some advice.

Also, I was wondering if there are any videos I could watch online of someone like you actually frothing milk. I think this would be so helpful. Thanks so much for your time.
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Cybercoffee
Senior Member


Joined: 18 Sep 2006
Posts: 12
Location: San Francisco
Expertise: I love coffee

Espresso: La Pavoni Europiccola/Jura...
Posted Mon Sep 18, 2006, 3:32pm
Subject: Re: The Milk Frothing Guide
 

Wonderful guide.  I'm struggling with creating microfoam at home. My work has a professional model machine we are able to use and it creates absolutely perfect foam.  I've skipped making coffee at home in preference for the real deal at the office.  My wife however wants our home machine to work just as well. I read that the type of machine has a lot to do with the foam quality. You mentioned that a basic heat exchanger model produces the best foam.  We have a superauto that is terrible. Thermoblock = bad foam? In the sub-2K range, based on foam alone, what's the best model to choose? Also, do all semi-auto models accept pods or is that model dependent. Wife wants a pod. (don't ask!)  Thanks,

Mark
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roccoincalifornia
Senior Member


Joined: 18 Apr 2005
Posts: 24
Location: West Coast
Expertise: I love coffee

Posted Thu Dec 7, 2006, 8:11am
Subject: Re: The Milk Frothing Guide
 

Great guide, has really changed my foaming.
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gormondroyd
Senior Member


Joined: 9 Jan 2007
Posts: 1
Location: UK
Expertise: I love coffee

Posted Sun Feb 4, 2007, 4:50am
Subject: Re: The Milk Frothing Guide
 

Wow what a great 'how to' as an 'newbie' to home coffee making its help me through the first informative weeks... just one question.. is there anyway to get an off linje version.. say as a .pdf.

it would be great to have a hard copy to refer to as I build my drinks

cheers again for a great guide

Graham
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alan_lee
Senior Member


Joined: 6 Mar 2007
Posts: 1
Location: Singapore
Expertise: Just starting

Posted Wed Mar 7, 2007, 6:45am
Subject: Re: The Milk Frothing Guide
 

Hi guys! My first post on this awesome site! :)

Am a newbie in the wonderful world of coffee brewing, and have been trying to froth milk with very very pathetic results. I'm using low-fat milk in a stainless steel receptacle, but what I get is just some bubbly (not big ones) and not the microfoam that the pros achieve. I'm using the Krups X2040.

Would be grateful if someone could help this helpless newbie! Thanks in advance!
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jesse6666
Senior Member


Joined: 6 Jul 2007
Posts: 4
Location: FL
Expertise: I like coffee

Posted Fri Jul 6, 2007, 7:59am
Subject: Re: The Milk Frothing Guide
 

Hello,


Excellent and informative article, but I still have a few questions...

I am new to commercial grade machines. For the past few years, I have been using the Starbucks Barista, and while not necessarily a latte artist, I was able to "create latte-artist-foam".

Recently, a family member purchased a SanRemo Commercial Espresso machine and grinder, which make the Starbucks machine look like a cheap gimmick.

However, the steamwand seems to be much bigger with a much wider tip and is MUCH MORE POWERFUL.

Instead of being able to hear little ch-ch-ch sounds while watching loads of microfoam being created in my old machine, I now either get milk splashing from out of the frothing cup or watch a whirlpool effect with little to no foam being created.

What's more, the milk gets heated 5 times faster than the starbucks machine, which makes it even more difficult for me to create any foam.

Any suggestions would be much appreciated. I've read many of the articles on CoffeeGeek and have been wondering whether the steamwand's tip is too large? But what do I know...
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Iconiq
Senior Member
Iconiq
Joined: 24 Apr 2007
Posts: 57
Location: Australia, QLD
Expertise: I live coffee

Espresso: Sunbeam EM6910
Grinder: Gaggia MDF
Roaster: Pop Corn Popper
Posted Mon Aug 6, 2007, 4:46am
Subject: Re: The Milk Frothing Guide
 

Hey all!

Can anyone tell me what i might be doing wrong? My latte art doesn't seem to flow as well as most of the clips I'm seeing. I've got really fine micro bubbles in my milk, I'm using fresh ground beans and have a VERY thick crema. Can that be a problem? Everything just seems a little stiff. I don't even bang the milk jug on the counter.(I was told that could make the milk to stiff for good latte art.) Anys suggestions would be great!

Des
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atao
Senior Member


Joined: 29 Jun 2007
Posts: 18
Location: san francisco
Expertise: I love coffee

Espresso: silvia, livietta
Posted Thu Aug 16, 2007, 7:52am
Subject: frothing in a 12oz pitcher - having problems
 

Hello,

I could use some help with getting microfoam in a 12oz pitcher with a Silvia. With a 20oz pitcher and say 10oz of milk, i've had pretty good success - pretty good microfoam; i generally stretch till about 100 then sink the wand a bit deeper and continue till around 140. I make sure to get a whirlpool, keep the wand near the side of the pitcher. The foam comes out pretty tight and homogenous.

But with 4-6oz of milk in a 12oz pitcher, i find that there seems to be just too much steam pressure (i have a new silvia) and if i open up the steam valve all the way, the milk will want to fly out of the pitcher. In addition, and i guess related to that, because the milk is going everywhere, its difficult to position the steaming wand at a good spot and i end up getting really poor foam.

I've tried freezing the pitcher and also i've tried (just a bit) opening the steam valve only partway, but from reading postings/looking at videos, it seems that i shouldn't have to try to trim the steam valve. i've also seen suggestions for small quantities of milk (3-6oz) that you can just sink the steaming wand deep and let it rip. This also hasn't really worked for me. Can anyone help here? Would really appreciate some help. I have seen the video of steaming in a McDonalds cup and yet i think that if i were to try that technique, milk would be on the walls in my kitchen.

On a related note, i was wondering how people succeed in steaming for 2 cappas in 1 pitcher. For example, i believe in the WBC, they typically steam into a single pitcher and then pour multiple cappas, but there was some special technique for this, such as pouring off some liquid. Any pointers here?

thanks in advance!
Andrew
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