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Discussions > Coffee > Home Roast > Dark roasting  
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Burner0000
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Posted Tue Aug 13, 2013, 11:06am
Subject: Dark roasting
 

I gave up roasting past FC over a year ago thinking any coffee past Vienna eliminated any taste a particular bean has to offer.  Lately I have been drinking a lot of dark blended coffee as well as Sumatra. Recently cupped a "clean" and even though it was good I found myself missing the traditional "dirty" Sumatra taste.  I'd like to start hunting around for some S.O's that can handle being roasted dark (Vienna-French).  What type of bean and process type gives the beans the edge to be able to keep it's flavor when roasting dark?
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Netphilosopher
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Posted Tue Aug 13, 2013, 11:10am
Subject: .
 

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Burner0000
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Roaster: Behmor 1600 / Sonofresco
Posted Tue Aug 13, 2013, 11:26am
Subject: Re: Dark roasting
 

Thx. I know Sumatra does too but what bean type can I roast dark and save the taste?
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Netphilosopher
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Posted Tue Aug 13, 2013, 2:00pm
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DavecUK
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Posted Tue Aug 13, 2013, 4:02pm
Subject: Re: Dark roasting
 

Burner0000 Said:

I gave up roasting past FC over a year ago thinking any coffee past Vienna eliminated any taste a particular bean has to offer.  Lately I have been drinking a lot of dark blended coffee as well as Sumatra. Recently cupped a "clean" and even though it was good I found myself missing the traditional "dirty" Sumatra taste.  I'd like to start hunting around for some S.O's that can handle being roasted dark (Vienna-French).  What type of bean and process type gives the beans the edge to be able to keep it's flavor when roasting dark?

Posted August 13, 2013 link

I'd revisit your roasting technique, because only roasting to 1st crack is probably good for defect cupping, but not generally good for taste....I'd struggle to think of any coffee I'd want to drink roasted only to 1st crack.
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Burner0000
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Joined: 28 Jul 2011
Posts: 1,089
Location: Cambridge, Ontario Canada
Expertise: Professional

Espresso: Rancilio Silvia, VFA Expres...
Grinder: Macap MX/VFA N1464/Kyocera...
Drip: Manual Drip, French Press
Roaster: Behmor 1600 / Sonofresco
Posted Wed Aug 14, 2013, 4:57am
Subject: Re: Dark roasting
 

I'm sorry I should have been more specific.  I meant beans that can handle dark roasts as is still taste good in a dark roast not maintain it's light roasted tones.  I know Brazil's, Sumatra's and some Columbia's taste the best at a Vienna or French roast.
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LowThudd
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Posted Wed Aug 14, 2013, 7:24am
Subject: Re: Dark roasting
 

I have had good luck roasting Tanzania Ruvuma Peaberry dark. Also Papua New Guinea Sergi Estate.
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Burner0000
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Espresso: Rancilio Silvia, VFA Expres...
Grinder: Macap MX/VFA N1464/Kyocera...
Drip: Manual Drip, French Press
Roaster: Behmor 1600 / Sonofresco
Posted Wed Aug 14, 2013, 7:56am
Subject: Re: Dark roasting
 

Were these beans soft beans?  Washed?  I figure that soft beans with a higher moisture content can handle the heat better eh?
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LowThudd
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Espresso: Gaggia Espresso, Mukka,...
Grinder: Grindmaster 625(RR45)
Roaster: Salton Popcorn popper
Posted Wed Aug 14, 2013, 8:05am
Subject: Re: Dark roasting
 

They are particularly oily beans. I didn't wash them, but they were pre washed I believe. From my limited experience, it seems oily beans can handle the darker roasts better. This would tend to make sense. Like the difference when cooking food with a dry pan verses an oiled pan. The dry pan will tend to scorch food. I think there is some similarity here.
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Burner0000
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Joined: 28 Jul 2011
Posts: 1,089
Location: Cambridge, Ontario Canada
Expertise: Professional

Espresso: Rancilio Silvia, VFA Expres...
Grinder: Macap MX/VFA N1464/Kyocera...
Drip: Manual Drip, French Press
Roaster: Behmor 1600 / Sonofresco
Posted Wed Aug 14, 2013, 8:27am
Subject: Re: Dark roasting
 

I mean is the process method when the coffee is picked from the fruit.  IME coffee's like Ethiopian which are high altitude grown (hard bean) and dry processed are roasted lighter to bring out it's floral and fruity flavors.  I'm looking for the other side of the spectrum.  

They are particularly oily beans. I didn't wash them, but they were pre washed I believe. From my limited experience, it seems oily beans can handle the darker roasts better. This would tend to make sense. Like the difference when cooking food with a dry pan verses an oiled pan. The dry pan will tend to scorch food. I think there is some similarity here.

 Oils when roasting dark regardless of bean will happen once you pass Full City.  I'd like to be able to read the beanology when shopping for raw green coffee and be able to specifically shop for "dark roasts".   Can this be done accurately?
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