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Time vs. Temperature in Roasting
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BuzzRoaster
Senior Member
BuzzRoaster
Joined: 16 Dec 2003
Posts: 34
Location: Macedon, NY
Expertise: Pro Roaster

Espresso: Rancilio Silvia
Roaster: Buzz Roasting Drum
Posted Fri Aug 23, 2013, 9:43pm
Subject: Re: Time vs. Temperature in Roasting
 

kozureokami

Read this. Click Here (www.sweetmarias.com) There is a 3 post series "Stretching Out the Roast" which I think will help you and answer many of your questions.
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Killovicz
Senior Member


Joined: 10 Sep 2010
Posts: 29
Location: Copenhagen
Expertise: I love coffee

Espresso: Gaggia :)
Grinder: Vario Home
Vac Pot: Moka Pot
Drip: AeroPress Sucks
Roaster: Custom Made Roster
Posted Tue Sep 3, 2013, 4:26am
Subject: Re: Time vs. Temperature in Roasting
 

DavecUK Said:

...roasting properly is a complex process and takes a lot of experience, because there are so many variables.

Posted August 14, 2013 link

I agree with the above, never the less I'll post my personal opinion, based on my personal experience (2years+, AT LEAST two roasts a week, 350g per roast):

copy/pace from another post

This is my personal opinion

Timing and temperature is very critical!! Try to shag a temperature probe i your roster, such that it penetrates the beans at all times!

04 min aprox. 135 C AT LEAST 120 C, drying period, some might argue for a higher temperature but not the timing! If drying happens to quickly the end product will taste grassy, however if it takes to long you loose plenty of flavor! Such that if you dry for 2min longer you loose AT LEAST 50% of flavor -->> personal opinion!!

08 min aprox. 185 C First crack begins.

10 min aprox. 200 C First crack peeks.

12 min aprox. 205C First crack ends, the been develops complex flavors, acid evaporates and/or turns into bitter/spicy flavors.

14 min. End of roast: 205C city, 210C city+, 215C full city.

Stick to city or city+,  use full city only as worst case scenario! If the been taste sour at city, city+, then change the been mate :),,,

Good luck mate :), it ain't easy... BUT IT PAYS OFF :D
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DavecUK
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Joined: 21 Sep 2005
Posts: 1,466
Location: UK
Expertise: I love coffee

Posted Tue Sep 3, 2013, 6:15am
Subject: Re: Time vs. Temperature in Roasting
 

I think in the above post this is pushing the roast along a little too quickly....especially for a small home roaster, where results are likely to not be as good as in a large 5-20kg commercial roaster....even then it's a bit quick.
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Killovicz
Senior Member


Joined: 10 Sep 2010
Posts: 29
Location: Copenhagen
Expertise: I love coffee

Espresso: Gaggia :)
Grinder: Vario Home
Vac Pot: Moka Pot
Drip: AeroPress Sucks
Roaster: Custom Made Roster
Posted Tue Sep 3, 2013, 11:19am
Subject: Re: Time vs. Temperature in Roasting
 

I've tried many different combinations and I've came to this conclusion..

If you "only" have a small commercial home roster then I'm very sorry :(. It's not my intention to make anyone feel bad about their machines nor to discourage anyone or in any other way to spoil somebody's day. I apologize up front.

Personal opinion -> Behmore is not really for "espresso roasting" never the less it's a fantastic machine for a lazy type of guy who brews a lot, perhaps only drink latte and cappuccino once in a while and never really drinks pure shots.

Gene/hottop should be able to roast at that speed but only perhaps 100 grams, perhaps even less :(. That's like 0.4kg/hour. I really doubt that anyone would mind the faff, not in the long run.  However if own one of those -->> then give it a try mate :)

Then if you find out that you need a bigger roaster you can:

Build one your self -> there are plenty drawings around, ain't that hard, doesn't need to be sophisticated, only needs a chamber, heat, thermometer and some sort of stir/turning mechanism.

Or you can buy some custom made home roaster, I've seen some around that looked reasonable.

The least you could do is get one these --> Click Here (www.sweetmarias.com)  or something alike --> then shag a temperature probe in there some how, I do not know how I don't have one of those, but it should be easy, perhaps drill a hole in the side or the lid. It's just VERY important that the probe penetrates the beans at all times!!!

Good luck :)
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