Our Valued Sponsor
OpinionsConsumer ReviewsGuides and How TosCoffeeGeek ReviewsResourcesForums
Coffee: Home Roasting Talk
first roaster
Cafe Solutions
Commercial sales and service, nationwide installation, equipment leasing options.
www.seattlecoffeegear.com
 
Not Logged in: Log In to Postlog in
New Topics updated topics   New Posts new posts   Unanswered Posts new unanswered  
Search Discussion Board search   Discussion Board FAQ faq   Signup sign up  
Discussions > Coffee > Home Roast > first roaster  
view previous topic | view next topic | view all topics
showing page 1 of 3 last page next page
Author Messages
tonini
Senior Member


Joined: 22 Jan 2013
Posts: 33
Location: GTA, Ontario, Canada
Expertise: I love coffee

Espresso: Silvia V3
Grinder: HG One
Posted Sun Oct 6, 2013, 10:23am
Subject: first roaster
 

Hello Everybody!

This past year Espresso has really taken over my hobbies! I find myself more interested by this website and making espresso than anything. I am interested in getting into roasting my own coffee. Does anyone have any recommendations? I was looking at hottops but unsure of what is appropriate . I currently buy my beans 1lb at a time and it lasts me roughly 2 weeks or less. I would like to keep this purchase below $1000 CDN. Does anyone have any suggestions of where to go in the Halton Hills Area?
back to top
 View Profile Link to this post
boar_d_laze
Senior Member


Joined: 21 Nov 2006
Posts: 1,208
Location: Monrovia, CA
Expertise: I live coffee

Espresso: La Cimbali M21 DT/1 Junior...
Grinder: Ceado E92; "Bunnzilla"
Vac Pot: Royal Coffee Maker
Drip: Chemex + Kone; Espro Press
Roaster: USRC Sample Roaster
Posted Mon Oct 7, 2013, 3:07pm
Subject: Re: first roaster
 

  • HotTop "B":  It may actually be a little over your budget to begin with.  Also, consider the probability that you'll soon be adding a couple of hundred bucksloonies in upgrades in the form of two thermocouples and a datalogger that installing the thermocouples will require some DIY handiness.  Takes awhile to cool down between batches, so takes longer than you might think to do a two or three roast session.  

  • GeneCafe:  A fluid-bed/drum hybrid.  Solid versatile roaster.  Not as much like a "real roaster" as the HT.  Also -- in my book -- not quite as good as the HT.  

  • Behmor:  Inexpensive, entry level drum roaster.  Does some nice roasts but is based on a few, pre-programmed "profiles" and doesn't give the user much control.  The nominal 16oz capacity is misleading.  In reality, its sweet spot is in the 8 - 11oz range.   Dose higher than 12oz, and roasts will be "baked."

  • Quest M3:  Probably 50% higher than your maximum price, even more once you take care of the (easy to install) telemetry.  It offers the most control, versatility, speed per roast and does batches the best, too.  A little kludgey though and not quite as beginner friendly as the other choices.  Is it the best choice of a small, electric, roaster for the serious hobbyist?  I might have said so a year ago.  No, I don't know.  

  • HT B modded with RL-HT-CTRL or the HTC+TC4C:  Adds another level of control and consistency to the HT B.  Making it -- probably -- the equal of the Quest M3.  Does not resolve the HT's other weakness (time between roasts).  

I own a slightly modded HT B (ET and BT thermocouples) still use it once in a while, because my other, larger, roaster is relatively underpowered, and still love it.  If you're serious about keeping your cost down to $1000, it's the way to go.  

I'm not sure what to tell you about the HT B with the RL-HT-CTRL or HTC+TC4 mod.  I hear they're great from people I trust but have never tried them.  And, they're going to require some minor DIY skills to install.  

On the other hand, although it's still something of a kludge, the Quest is a finished product, and adding electronic thermometry doesn't require anything more than replacing a couple of bolts with thermpcouples and commercially available (from EricS) fittings.  With either machine, there's enough of a supportive community and enough cheat sheets floating around that it shouldn't take too long before you're getting usable roasts.  

There's some "waste" in roasting -- weight loss between greens and roasted beans -- about 15%.  But if you're like almost everyone, you also end up doing a lot of roasting for others -- especially around the holidays.  

Hope this helps,
BDL
back to top
 View Profile Visit website Link to this post
tonini
Senior Member


Joined: 22 Jan 2013
Posts: 33
Location: GTA, Ontario, Canada
Expertise: I love coffee

Espresso: Silvia V3
Grinder: HG One
Posted Tue Oct 8, 2013, 3:12pm
Subject: Re: first roaster
 

Thank you for the fantastic reply. Apart of me wants to wait for a hottop as the quest is just too expensive for me right now. But I'm worried about liking it you know? I love coffee but I've never roasted. I thought about going cheap to start like a sr500 but I'm worried by going to a non high end unit much like a bad coffee grinder it will effect the product I create which can essentially make me feel sour towards home roasting. Can a cheaper roaster produce great espresso in small quantities? Please feedback would be fantastic.
back to top
 View Profile Link to this post
johnboddie
Senior Member


Joined: 28 Nov 2008
Posts: 205
Location: Virginia
Expertise: I love coffee

Espresso: MCAL, Brasilia Mini Classic,...
Grinder: Rossi RR45a,Rocky,...
Drip: Cuisinart (non-grinding)
Roaster: Behmor 1600
Posted Tue Oct 8, 2013, 4:27pm
Subject: Re: first roaster
 

Yes, a small, inexpensive roaster can produce high quality, consistent roasts. I started with a popper (to which I added a digital thermometer) and graduated to a Behmor, which I've used for a year doing half-pound roasts. I'm roasting both Columbian for my wife's drip and Ethiopean for my SO espresso and in both cases I've learned that the key factor in getting really good roasts is your ability to track the roast by sound and aroma. Timers and thermometers help, but roasting is not a push-the-button-and-forget-it operation.

Behmor support is excellent. If you have any problems, you can call them and be astounded at the speed with which they reply and the follow-up after the call.
back to top
 View Profile Link to this post
tonini
Senior Member


Joined: 22 Jan 2013
Posts: 33
Location: GTA, Ontario, Canada
Expertise: I love coffee

Espresso: Silvia V3
Grinder: HG One
Posted Tue Oct 8, 2013, 4:31pm
Subject: Re: first roaster
 

Thanks for your feedback. I am looking to roast Brazilian for my espresso. I am really torn between a behmor and hottop. The feedback of both are so great. I do not know thought if a Hottop is a machine you can grow in to if that makes sense. With such control, I wonder if i will be incredibly lost.
back to top
 View Profile Link to this post
MerleApAmber
Senior Member


Joined: 13 Nov 2012
Posts: 203
Location: Atlanta
Expertise: I love coffee

Espresso: Breville BES900
Grinder: Baratza Preciso + Esatto
Vac Pot: Yuma
Drip: bah-humbug
Roaster: Hot Top 2K P
Posted Tue Oct 8, 2013, 8:08pm
Subject: Re: first roaster
 

johnboddie Said:

learned that the key factor in getting really good roasts is your ability to track the roast by sound and aroma. Timers and thermometers help, but roasting is not a push-the-button-and-forget-it operation. .

Posted October 8, 2013 link

I like my factory hot top. And add, visual change in the beans helps during the critical last four minutes.
back to top
 View Profile Link to this post
Burner0000
Senior Member


Joined: 28 Jul 2011
Posts: 1,076
Location: Cambridge, Ontario Canada
Expertise: Professional

Espresso: Rancilio Silvia, VFA Expres...
Grinder: Macap MX/VFA N1464/Kyocera...
Drip: Manual Drip, French Press
Roaster: Behmor 1600 / Sonofresco
Posted Wed Oct 9, 2013, 7:12am
Subject: Re: first roaster
 

Coming from a previous Behmor owner, current SR500 owner unless you wanna go commercial the Hottop is the closest thing to a real drum roaster.  The Behmor is great but the newer Hottop's let you custom roast which is big!  The Hottop's are built sturdy and can handle back to back roasting not to mention the show. :)  If you need to roast 1 lb the Behmor is great but the Hottop, roasting back to back will deliver better tasting coffee based on your personal preference.  The money you will save roasting yourself compared to buying roasted will pay the roaster off pretty fast.

Side note: The Behmor can roast a full 454 g batch even to FC-Vienna roast without baking the coffee you just need good voltage.
Consistant 125V/15A line.
back to top
 View Profile Contact via MSN Messenger Link to this post
tonini
Senior Member


Joined: 22 Jan 2013
Posts: 33
Location: GTA, Ontario, Canada
Expertise: I love coffee

Espresso: Silvia V3
Grinder: HG One
Posted Wed Oct 9, 2013, 2:58pm
Subject: Re: first roaster
 

As I continue to get great replies which I thank all of you for, I lean more and more to Hottop. Can I ease into a Hottop though? With all this control can a complete beginner with no roasting experience learn and build success on this? Or is the Hottop just far to complicated for me?
back to top
 View Profile Link to this post
germantownrob
Senior Member
germantownrob
Joined: 2 Dec 2007
Posts: 2,150
Location: Philadelphia
Expertise: I love coffee

Espresso: Duetto 3, A Dead Oscar
Grinder: Vario-W, Preciso w/Esatto,...
Drip: Brazen
Roaster: Diedrich IR-1, HT B
Posted Wed Oct 9, 2013, 5:24pm
Subject: Re: first roaster
 

tonini Said:

As I continue to get great replies which I thank all of you for, I lean more and more to Hottop. Can I ease into a Hottop though? With all this control can a complete beginner with no roasting experience learn and build success on this? Or is the Hottop just far to complicated for me?

Posted October 9, 2013 link

Short answer is yes. The controls of the roaster are simple once you get to know them, it is easy enough to do standard roast without much messing with the controls, and there are many people who use them or have used them. It is a durable roaster and all parts are available if something needs fixing, the entire machine can be broken down for cleaning although some of the screws will never really tighten again.

I roasted on a Behmor for 6 months then got the HotTop B, I may have learned some cues from sight, sound and smell on the Behmor but I still needed to learn how to roast on the HotTop. However I knew after six months that roasting was for me and had no problem spending the money on the HotTop which roasted close to a thousand pounds before being replaced by a commercial 1kg gas drum roaster. I still have my HotTop and don't ever think I will part with it or its memories.
back to top
 View Profile Link to this post
ECM
Senior Member
ECM
Joined: 11 Oct 2003
Posts: 476
Location: Halifax, Nova Scotia Canada
Expertise: I like coffee

Espresso: Quick Mill Vetrano 2B
Grinder: Mazzer Robour E
Vac Pot: French Press
Drip: no
Roaster: Fresh Roast+8,  i-roast and...
Posted Wed Oct 9, 2013, 5:59pm
Subject: Re: first roaster
 

I had a HotTop P.  I was unable to do back to back roasts.  The unit had to cool down for about 30-45 minutes.  How do you do back to back?
back to top
 View Profile Visit website Link to this post
showing page 1 of 3 last page next page
view previous topic | view next topic | view all topics
Discussions > Coffee > Home Roast > first roaster  
New Topics updated topics   New Posts new posts   Unanswered Posts new unanswered     Search Discussion Board search   Discussion Board FAQ faq   Signup sign up  
Not Logged in: Log In to Postlog in
Discussions Quick Jump:
Symbols: New Posts= New Posts since your last visit      No New Posts= No New Posts since last visit     Go to most recent post= Newest post
Forum Rules:
No profanity, illegal acts or personal attacks will be tolerated in these discussion boards.
No commercial posting of any nature will be tolerated; only private sales by private individuals, in the "Buy and Sell" forum.
No SEO style postings will be tolerated. SEO related posts will result in immediate ban from CoffeeGeek.
No cross posting allowed - do not post your topic to more than one forum, nor repost a topic to the same forum.
Who Can Read The Forum? Anyone can read posts in these discussion boards.
Who Can Post New Topics? Any registered CoffeeGeek member can post new topics.
Who Can Post Replies? Any registered CoffeeGeek member can post replies.
Can Photos be posted? Anyone can post photos in their new topics or replies.
Who can change or delete posts? Any CoffeeGeek member can edit their own posts. Only moderators can delete posts.
Probationary Period: If you are a new signup for CoffeeGeek, you cannot promote, endorse, criticise or otherwise post an unsolicited endorsement for any company, product or service in your first five postings.
Stefano's Espresso Care
Repair - Parts - Sales
Factory Authorized &
Trained Technician
www.espressocare.com
Home | Opinions | Consumer Reviews | Guides & How Tos | CoffeeGeek Reviews | Resources | Forums | Contact Us
CoffeeGeek.com, CoffeeGeek, and Coffee Geek, along with all associated content & images are copyright ©2000-2014 by Mark Prince, all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated. Content, code, and images may not be reused without permission. Usage of this website signifies agreement with our Terms and Conditions. (0.313104867935)
Privacy Policy | Copyright Info | Terms and Conditions | CoffeeGeek Advertisers | RSS | Find us on Google+