Our Valued Sponsor
OpinionsConsumer ReviewsGuides and How TosCoffeeGeek ReviewsResourcesForums
Coffee: Home Roasting Talk
Letting beans rest after roasting
Support Coffee Kids
Coffee Kids is a non profit charity working with farming communities around the world. Donate today!
www.coffeekids.org
 
Not Logged in: Log In to Postlog in
New Topics updated topics   New Posts new posts   Unanswered Posts new unanswered  
Search Discussion Board search   Discussion Board FAQ faq   Signup sign up  
Discussions > Coffee > Home Roast > Letting beans...  
view previous topic | view next topic | view all topics
showing page 1 of 2 last page next page
Author Messages
fllawyer
Senior Member


Joined: 15 Jan 2014
Posts: 1
Location: United States
Expertise: Just starting

Posted Thu Jan 16, 2014, 8:15am
Subject: Letting beans rest after roasting
 

Hi all.  Just got my first Behmor 1600, and have made a few batches with what I think are increasing degrees of success.  Few quick questions.  First, what's the best procedure for storing/using beans after I roast them?  Air-tight container for 48-72 hours before I put them in my automatic machine? And what's the maximum time I should keep roasted beans for (as in, will they go bad/lose their taste after a month?)  Thank you!
back to top
 View Profile Link to this post
RandomTask
Senior Member


Joined: 30 Jan 2013
Posts: 67
Location: Saskatchewan, Canada
Expertise: I love coffee

Grinder: Barratza Encore
Drip: Behmor Brazen
Roaster: Behmor 1600
Posted Thu Jan 16, 2014, 8:35am
Subject: Re: Letting beans rest after roasting
 

For coffee, I've heard the "Rule of 15's"; greens are good 15 months from picking, coffee is good 15 days from roasting and grounds are good 15 minutes from grinding. As for storage, look for something that seals tightly so your coffee doesn't lose all the good stuff. Mason jars are always a good option as they come in a variety of sizes and seal up well.

Personally I keep my roasted coffee in what best could be described as "candy jars". Large-ish glass jars (holds about 1/2 lbs each) that have a rubber gastketed lid. I ususally set the lid on, though not super tight (so gas can still escape) and let it sit usually overnight. I roast after the kids are in bed, then usually seal it up when I make coffee the next morning. That usually works to be about 12 hours, while I tend to "burp" them again around 24 and 36 hours. After that I usually let them rest for 4 days total before using them. That's the point I tend to find the best taste, though YMMV.
back to top
 View Profile Link to this post
Burner0000
Senior Member


Joined: 28 Jul 2011
Posts: 1,069
Location: Cambridge, Ontario Canada
Expertise: Professional

Espresso: Rancilio Silvia, VFA Expres...
Grinder: Macap MX/VFA N1464/Kyocera...
Drip: Manual Drip, French Press
Roaster: Behmor 1600 / Sonofresco
Posted Thu Jan 16, 2014, 8:35am
Subject: Re: Letting beans rest after roasting
 

Congrats on the Behmor! Depending on the beans you are roasting a 24 hr minimum is a good thing. I usually give all of my coffee 48hrs +.  Any sooner and my espresso is pure crema. Airtight container is good.  If your using glass try too keep the beans in a dark area to prevent any UV from aging the beans. Up to two weeks you get the all the freshness, after that the coffee begins to go stale.  I usually roast for a month myself but I notice a difference after about 15-20 days but still tastes good to me. I've gotten rid of jar storage because I've read any oxygen in with your beans is going to make them go bag sooner so I've switched to foil valved bags.  They are great. I can wash and reuse them.  I've used the same bag now for 2 kg so far. :P
back to top
 View Profile Visit website Contact via MSN Messenger Link to this post
BarryR
Senior Member


Joined: 21 Nov 2010
Posts: 278
Location: Wilbraham
Expertise: I love coffee

Espresso: CC1
Grinder: Baratza Preciso
Drip: Behmor Brazen, Clever...
Roaster: Hottop KN-8828B2-K
Posted Thu Jan 16, 2014, 6:06pm
Subject: Re: Letting beans rest after roasting
 

Agree with above.
Regarding rest time:

I too find four days is often ideal.
Darker roasts tend to need less rest than lighter and rustic / wilder coffees (like dry processed and Sumatran) sometimes are better with longer rests.

I use a combo of foil bags with valves, canisters with valves and air-tight canisters.
back to top
 View Profile Link to this post
Prof
Senior Member
Prof
Joined: 10 Sep 2004
Posts: 708
Location: Seattle
Expertise: Pro Roaster

Espresso: PV Lusso
Grinder: Pharos 696
Drip: Aeropress
Roaster: Behmor 1600+
Posted Thu Jan 16, 2014, 9:11pm
Subject: Re: Letting beans rest after roasting
 

It is fun to take note of how the roasts change over a week or two.  One of my roasts last week had "sour cherry" aroma on one day and less so the next day.  That was cool.

I got a coffee seal rig from Seattle Coffee Gear that works pretty well.  It's called Airscape.

 
LMWDP # 010
back to top
 View Profile Link to this post
javacrazed
Senior Member
javacrazed
Joined: 10 Apr 2014
Posts: 15
Location: LA
Expertise: I live coffee

Espresso: Rocket Cellini...
Grinder: Baratza Forte, Mahlkonig K30...
Roaster: Hottop
Posted Thu Apr 10, 2014, 12:10pm
Subject: Re: Letting beans rest after roasting
 

I roast with a hottop and roast 250 grams twice a week. I leave a fresh roast out for about 4 hours after roast to release gases.  I them put in a push down airtight lid container while waiting "on deck" then I just leave in my cleaned forte grinder hopper.  I move through the beans rather quickly so I don't worry myself on freshness.  Peak is 48+ out for dark 24+ out for lighter roast.
back to top
 View Profile Link to this post
Goldensncoffee
Senior Member
Goldensncoffee
Joined: 9 Feb 2014
Posts: 74
Location: Pennsylvania
Expertise: I like coffee

Grinder: Breville Smart, Skerton
Posted Fri Apr 11, 2014, 5:00am
Subject: Re: Letting beans rest after roasting
 

I'm just starting out but from my limited experience I've found the coffee tastes better after 4-5 days of rest. I use mason jars stored in a cabitet.
back to top
 View Profile Link to this post
boar_d_laze
Senior Member


Joined: 21 Nov 2006
Posts: 1,179
Location: Monrovia, CA
Expertise: I live coffee

Espresso: La Cimbali M21 DT/1 Junior...
Grinder: Ceado E92; "Bunnzilla"
Vac Pot: Royal Coffee Maker
Drip: Chemex + Kone; Espro Press
Roaster: USRC Sample Roaster
Posted Fri Apr 11, 2014, 6:43am
Subject: Re: Letting beans rest after roasting
 

Babbie's Rule of Fifteens is fine as far as it goes, but doesn't address many of the distinctions of ordinary storage, brewing and grinding.  

Because the espresso grind is finer, and because espresso is made with pressurized water, espresso machines more efficiently extract a bean's bad and good than ordinary brew methods.  Consequently, the respective windows of fresh/rested for espresso and brew are considerably different.  In general, brew beans go from fresh to rested to stale roughly twice as fast as espresso.  

Cupping is its own thing.  Cupping is brewing for predicting what a particular profile will taste like when it's been properly rested and used either for brew or as espresso.  It's called "cupping" because coffee used and ground for the purpose is brewed in a cup

What I call "quasi-cupping" is probably used more often by home roasters, who don't want to go the enormous PITA that's SCAA/COE style cupping; but do want to get the maximum amount of information from their roasts, so they can tweak their profiles on purpose.  

Since you're just starting out, this probably sounds daunting.  But cupping is not the first part of learning to roast, so don't worry too much about it.  The more and the better you roast, the more important it becomes.  When it's necessary, you'll know and start working on it.    

For cupping:
  • Same day -- EVERYBODY cups same day;
  • 24 - 48 hrs post roast -- SCAA "cupping" standard.  A little rest makes a difference, you'll get somewhat better development and separation.  Whether that makes a big difference in your life as a roaster depends on why you cup, if you cup at all.

For brew:
  • 2 days minimum -- for quasi-cupping;
  • 3 days -- the "best" window opens;
  • 4 - 7 days -- a little bit of paradise;
  • 8 days -- the "best" window closes;
  • 12 days -- the "usable" window slams shut.

For espresso:
  • 4 days -- a dark roast is barely drinkable;
  • 6 days -- the "best" window opens;
  • 7 - 12 days -- best of the best;
  • 14 days -- the "best" window closes;
  • 21 days -- the "usable" window slams shut.

We store and age in either Coffee Vacs, or the one-way valved, heat sealed bags roasters use.  

Coffee Vacs are great.  Can't say too much good about them.  I'm not a professional by any means, never played one on television (if you're old enough to remember that line), but know a few.  They all love Coffee Vacs and use them in their own homes.  

Coffee Vacs come in two sizes, and a bunch of colors.  They're plastic, and more reasonably priced than the stainless, valved alternatives.  In our experience the Vacs work as well as anything with a one-way valve.  Of course, you're entitled to your own experience.

Side gusseted, valved bags are $24/50 count; while a decent heat sealer runs around $30 at Amazon.  

We got into bags because so much of our coffee goes to other people it makes sense; also my wife bought me my first batch as a gift because she knows I like to play at being pro -- and they turn out to be as useful as they are fun.  

You can store sealed bags in the freezer pretty well; about as well as Mason jars, in my opinion.  For our use, I'm all in favor of storing some beans in the freezer for emergencies (like I got lazy and put off roasting so we ran out of appropriately rested coffee or something we particularly wanted to drink); but don't think defrosted coffee is quite as good as coffee stored at room temp and ground at its freshness/rested peak.  

However if the distinction is more than imagination (which it may well be), it's pretty damn subtle.  Also, it's just my opinion; not some sort of Revealed Truth.  

Our experience with vacuum sealing is that it's a waste of beans and nothingness.

Rich
back to top
 View Profile Visit website Link to this post
OregonCityMan
Senior Member
OregonCityMan
Joined: 30 Oct 2013
Posts: 40
Location: Portland, Oregon
Expertise: I love coffee

Espresso: Salvatore SES Semi
Grinder: Ascaso I-2 mini
Roaster: Torrefattore 1KG, DIY 1/2lb
Posted Thu Apr 24, 2014, 3:28pm
Subject: Re: Letting beans rest after roasting
 

On the subject of gusseted foil bags and heat sealers. I used to roast for a couple of diners a friend of mine owned back in 2006/07. I purchased my bags from a company in Chino, California. They were 12 to 16oz side gusseted foil bags with valves, and I still use them today. I would use the $100, 6"jaw sealer available on Amazon to seal the bags. The $30 sealer boar_d_laze mentions on Amazon is probably an impulse sealer, which is suitable for poly bags only. I know as I own both of them. The 6" jaw sealer is constant on and 25 watts per jaw, with serrated Teflon jaws. That puppy will seal the heavy foil bags in about three seconds. The impulse sealer can seal heavy foil bags but not in one attempt, and the elements burn out too easy.
back to top
 View Profile Link to this post
MassWineGuy
Senior Member


Joined: 2 May 2012
Posts: 8
Location: Massachusetts
Expertise: I like coffee

Posted Sat Apr 26, 2014, 7:37am
Subject: Re: Letting beans rest after roasting
 

It's important not to tighten the seal on roasted beans for the first 12 hours or so. This lets the CO2 vent.
back to top
 View Profile Link to this post
showing page 1 of 2 last page next page
view previous topic | view next topic | view all topics
Discussions > Coffee > Home Roast > Letting beans...  
New Topics updated topics   New Posts new posts   Unanswered Posts new unanswered     Search Discussion Board search   Discussion Board FAQ faq   Signup sign up  
Not Logged in: Log In to Postlog in
Discussions Quick Jump:
Symbols: New Posts= New Posts since your last visit      No New Posts= No New Posts since last visit     Go to most recent post= Newest post
Forum Rules:
No profanity, illegal acts or personal attacks will be tolerated in these discussion boards.
No commercial posting of any nature will be tolerated; only private sales by private individuals, in the "Buy and Sell" forum.
No SEO style postings will be tolerated. SEO related posts will result in immediate ban from CoffeeGeek.
No cross posting allowed - do not post your topic to more than one forum, nor repost a topic to the same forum.
Who Can Read The Forum? Anyone can read posts in these discussion boards.
Who Can Post New Topics? Any registered CoffeeGeek member can post new topics.
Who Can Post Replies? Any registered CoffeeGeek member can post replies.
Can Photos be posted? Anyone can post photos in their new topics or replies.
Who can change or delete posts? Any CoffeeGeek member can edit their own posts. Only moderators can delete posts.
Probationary Period: If you are a new signup for CoffeeGeek, you cannot promote, endorse, criticise or otherwise post an unsolicited endorsement for any company, product or service in your first five postings.
Stefano's Espresso Care
Repair - Parts - Sales
Factory Authorized &
Trained Technician
www.espressocare.com
Home | Opinions | Consumer Reviews | Guides & How Tos | CoffeeGeek Reviews | Resources | Forums | Contact Us
CoffeeGeek.com, CoffeeGeek, and Coffee Geek, along with all associated content & images are copyright ©2000-2014 by Mark Prince, all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated. Content, code, and images may not be reused without permission. Usage of this website signifies agreement with our Terms and Conditions. (0.259176015854)
Privacy Policy | Copyright Info | Terms and Conditions | CoffeeGeek Advertisers | RSS | Find us on Google+