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Discussions > Coffee > Home Roast > You roast enough...  
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JWK
Senior Member


Joined: 25 Nov 2013
Posts: 21
Location: central New York
Expertise: I love coffee

Grinder: OE Pharos
Drip: French Press
Roaster: Behmor 1600
Posted Mon Mar 3, 2014, 3:10pm
Subject: You roast enough for one week - When do you start brewing?
 

So I'm on a weekly roasting schedule with the old Behmor.  This gets us exactly 7 days of coffee.  My roast is somewhere between City and Vienna.  If I hear the slightest hint of 2C I hit cool and open the door with the shop vac running.  That's as specific as I can get.  It's usually around 2 minutes past the beginning of 1C, but it does vary quite a bit depending on the coffee.  I do 8 oz. at a time and I'm coming to the end of all my 1 lb. bags from Sweet Maria's.  It will be quite a relief to settle into a 10 lb. bag of something.

Anyway, I usually wait 48 hours before brewing.  Given that my roasting session gives us a 7 day supply, what do you think the optimum time would be to wait?  I'm thinking of going to a three day wait.  There just seems to be something missing in the first brew or two.  Maybe a better question for some would be:  How many days does your coffee go until you start to notice it getting stale?

Thanks for sharing any opinions, observations, etc.
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IntrepidQ3
Senior Member


Joined: 30 Sep 2013
Posts: 64
Location: Tampa, FL
Expertise: I live coffee

Espresso: Gaggia Classic PID
Grinder: Vario
Vac Pot: Royal Balance Syphon
Roaster: Hottop+TC4C
Posted Mon Mar 3, 2014, 6:00pm
Subject: Re: You roast enough for one week - When do you start brewing?
 

The question of how long to let my roast rest is a question I still struggle with, even after about 4 months of reading and experimenting.

I have come to honestly believe the correct answer is, it depends. The two large factors I have noticed from experience are the origin and the level of roast. For example, I had a pound from Ethiopia. If I attempted to brew it in any fashion before a week or two of rest it was just aweful. But with some patience it made some pretty delicious coffee. Now I have some beans from Kenya that need about 3 or 4 days of rest. But I also have some from Brazil, roasted at the same level, that is really good after 48 hours. I have not been doing this long enough to be able to develop a rule of thumb break down by origin, not even sure one is out there.

Currently I am thinking darker roasts need longer to rest than light roasts... Again, I have not been doing this long enough to say for certain. I base this off of reading that darker roasts for espresso need to rest longer than if they are brewed for regular coffee. Not sure if this is due to brew method or roast level.

So I guess another factor might be brew method?

Hopefully someone more knowledgable chimes!
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Prof
Senior Member
Prof
Joined: 10 Sep 2004
Posts: 715
Location: Seattle
Expertise: Pro Roaster

Espresso: PV Lusso
Grinder: Pharos 696
Drip: Aeropress
Roaster: Behmor 1600+
Posted Mon Mar 3, 2014, 7:07pm
Subject: Re: You roast enough for one week - When do you start brewing?
 

You are over-thinking it.  Relax and try the beans 2 or 3 or 4 days after roasting.  Then observe the changes over the next week.

Sometimes I try a one-day old roast, and sometimes it is really good.  It's all part of the experience.

We geeks do like to try to be perfect in our coffee hobby, but our equipment usually gets in the way of the ultimate coffee experience, whether it be a god-shot or perfect carafe.

 
LMWDP # 010
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Frost
Senior Member
Frost
Joined: 26 Jul 2007
Posts: 2,105
Location: Sierra
Expertise: I love coffee

Espresso: Isomac Venus
Grinder: Lelit PL53
Roaster: Poppery I w/variac, MET, BT
Posted Mon Mar 3, 2014, 8:55pm
Subject: Re: You roast enough for one week - When do you start brewing?
 

I roast about once a week too. It works out great most of the time starting at day 3-4, finish at day 10 or so. Sometimes I get behind, a couple days 'too fresh'.  I agree with Prof; just relax and enjoy/explore the ride as the beans rest and change in this range (1-14 days). Report back after 6 months or a year.  There are not many who get to suffer a roast that is too fresh.
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IntrepidQ3
Senior Member


Joined: 30 Sep 2013
Posts: 64
Location: Tampa, FL
Expertise: I live coffee

Espresso: Gaggia Classic PID
Grinder: Vario
Vac Pot: Royal Balance Syphon
Roaster: Hottop+TC4C
Posted Tue Mar 4, 2014, 2:47am
Subject: Re: You roast enough for one week - When do you start brewing?
 

Prof Said:

You are over-thinking it.  Relax and try the beans 2 or 3 or 4 days after roasting.  Then observe the changes over the next week.

Posted March 3, 2014 link

Yea I tend to do that from time to time. I guess maybe a roasted bean is a roasted bean. Sit back and enjoy the ever changing flavor of it while it lasts.
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JWK
Senior Member


Joined: 25 Nov 2013
Posts: 21
Location: central New York
Expertise: I love coffee

Grinder: OE Pharos
Drip: French Press
Roaster: Behmor 1600
Posted Tue Mar 4, 2014, 5:15am
Subject: Re: You roast enough for one week - When do you start brewing?
 

Thanks, everyone.  I guess this kind of verifies what I've suspected.  Different beans are *very* different.  Then you throw a different roast in and you're all over the map.

The free 8 lb. starter pack you get with the Behmor is a great deal.  The downside is that you roast one half pound, then figure out what you want to try for the next half pound, then it's gone and you start all over with a totally different bean that will roast up differently from the last pound you didn't even have a chance to get right.  To add to this agony on my part: My daughter, finding out I was getting a Behmor for Christmas, gave me four different pounds of coffee on Christmas morning.  So I started with 12 different pounds of coffee.

But I'm exaggerating my suffering for fun.  It's been a real learning experience and all the coffee still beats anything we can buy locally.  

OTOH, if I hadn't come on to this board looking for a suitable replacement for my old, stamped out, brass garbage grinder from Turkey, I never would have found out about home roasting and wouldn't be in this mess right now.  I probably would have received a Kyocera grinder for Christmas that would have been 10 times better than the piece of junk I've been using for the past 13 years, continued to buy our 2.5 lb. bags of "fresh" coffee from our local warehouse store and been happy.  But oh, no, no, no.  We can't have that.  Now I have a Pharos grinder and a Behmor roaster.  Now I know my equipment is just kindergarten stuff.  Now I struggle knowing my roasts should be better and am constantly dissapointed because I think my morning coffee should be so much better than it is.

So, yeah.  THANKS, EVERYONE!!!!

A ha ha ha ha ha ha ha!!!!!
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brianl
Senior Member


Joined: 1 Dec 2012
Posts: 524
Location: Chicago IL
Expertise: I love coffee

Espresso: Quick Mill Vetrano DB
Grinder: HG One, OE Lido 2, Baratza...
Drip: Chemex/V60
Roaster: Behmor 1600
Posted Tue Mar 4, 2014, 6:43am
Subject: Re: You roast enough for one week - When do you start brewing?
 

IntrepidQ3 Said:

The question of how long to let my roast rest is a question I still struggle with, even after about 4 months of reading and experimenting.

I have come to honestly believe the correct answer is, it depends. The two large factors I have noticed from experience are the origin and the level of roast. For example, I had a pound from Ethiopia. If I attempted to brew it in any fashion before a week or two of rest it was just aweful. But with some patience it made some pretty delicious coffee. Now I have some beans from Kenya that need about 3 or 4 days of rest. But I also have some from Brazil, roasted at the same level, that is really good after 48 hours. I have not been doing this long enough to be able to develop a rule of thumb break down by origin, not even sure one is out there.

Currently I am thinking darker roasts need longer to rest than light roasts... Again, I have not been doing this long enough to say for certain. I base this off of reading that darker roasts for espresso need to rest longer than if they are brewed for regular coffee. Not sure if this is due to brew method or roast level.

So I guess another factor might be brew method?

Hopefully someone more knowledgable chimes!

Posted March 3, 2014 link

I have noticed that the darker the roasts the FASTER it goes stale and the better it tastes around 4-8 days post roast. With the light roasts, it will start to hit its peak around 8-10 days. This is just my observation.
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Prof
Senior Member
Prof
Joined: 10 Sep 2004
Posts: 715
Location: Seattle
Expertise: Pro Roaster

Espresso: PV Lusso
Grinder: Pharos 696
Drip: Aeropress
Roaster: Behmor 1600+
Posted Tue Mar 4, 2014, 7:06am
Subject: Re: You roast enough for one week - When do you start brewing?
 

The Behmor is capable of producing great roasts and is totally unbeatable in the price range.  Spend more time getting familiar with the machine, using P3 and P4 as well as P2.  You'll have to triple your investment for more control.

Your Pharos is hardly kindergarten equipment.  It's a lifetime grinder unless you want to plunk over $1.2k or more for an electric one.

It's a hobby, after all, right?

 
LMWDP # 010
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IntrepidQ3
Senior Member


Joined: 30 Sep 2013
Posts: 64
Location: Tampa, FL
Expertise: I live coffee

Espresso: Gaggia Classic PID
Grinder: Vario
Vac Pot: Royal Balance Syphon
Roaster: Hottop+TC4C
Posted Tue Mar 4, 2014, 2:30pm
Subject: Re: You roast enough for one week - When do you start brewing?
 

brianl Said:

I have noticed that the darker the roasts the FASTER it goes stale and the better it tastes around 4-8 days post roast. With the light roasts, it will start to hit its peak around 8-10 days. This is just my observation.

Posted March 4, 2014 link

This would make sense to me, as the darker the roast more broken down the structure becomes. I mentioned longer rest for darker roasts because I have read that roasts for espresso (typically on the dark end of the spectrum) tend to require a weeks rest. I guess I should mention that I have found this not always to be the case. I do not have the self control to wait the full week and tend to start pulling espresso sometimes as soon as 24 hours after roast and it sometimes it does taste a lot better than waiting the full week.

In the end, its about experimenting to find your own personal taste preference.
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