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Cold brewing coffee, unexpected benefits
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Discussions > Coffee > Machines > Cold brewing...  
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Ramblin
Senior Member
Ramblin
Joined: 25 Jul 2004
Posts: 195
Location: Missouri
Expertise: I live coffee

Espresso: Aereo?
Grinder: KA Proline,
Drip: Melitta Clarity
Roaster: Iroast, SC/CO
Posted Sat Jun 2, 2007, 5:22pm
Subject: Cold brewing coffee, unexpected benefits
 

I bought a Filtron brewer recently for my father who was having long term severe acid reflux that has not been responding to medication. Reports show cold brew coffee to has a 67% reduction of acid in coffee and a 20% reduction in caffeine. After testing the process using cheesecloth in a large strainer and being pleased with the results, I quickly came the conclusion that I must acquire new coffee geek toys. So of course I bought two filtron units. One for me to play with and one for my father.

1 pound of coffee to 9 cups water steep for at least 12 hours. Many do a second extraction (12 hours) with a third less water and then mix the two batches together for consistency. I was using just Folgers as that was what my dad usually drank.

I really wasn't wild about mixing the folgers concentrate with hot water for hot coffee. It was OK, but again it was Folgers. It was pretty smooth and seemed to not bother my stomach. The jury is still out if it is helping my dad's acid reflux, but the reduction in caffeine has to help some.

The unexpected benefits?
Cold coffee drinks are GREAT!
I have been able to use some home roasted beans that I wasn't crazy about brewed conventionally. I have close to 30 lbs of these beans left, so maybe I can use them up now.
Can vary coffee strength easily for other family members. Not strong enough? Add another ounce of concentrate to your cup.
Don't feel like brewing when your half awake stumbling around in the kitchen? Cup of water in the microwave for a couple of minutes, add concentrate and you're set.  
I have been thinking for years that I should try to make my own Kahlua. I might actually get around to doing so using the concentrate. Should be some rocking stuff.

The bad? We are consuming at least another gallon of milk a week drinking cold coffee drinks.

A really cheap homemade cold coffee extractor
http://www.ineedcoffee.com/06/coldhome/


Related story
http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/5728227/
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rasqual
Senior Member
rasqual
Joined: 29 Jun 2005
Posts: 1,076
Location: Chicago area
Expertise: I love coffee

Espresso: *$ Barista, non-pressurized
Grinder: SMP
Vac Pot: Yama, Aeropress
Drip: Porcelain Melitta 103, Hario
Roaster: "ring roaster", mod popper
Posted Sun Jun 3, 2007, 6:41am
Subject: Re: Cold brewing coffee, unexpected benefits
 

I like the "cheap" method you linked to. I also like that the author didn't even mention refrigerating during extraction. It's not necessary, though many people speak of "cold brew" as if it should be done cold.

"Cold brew" methods can be employed in service of conventional brewing. If I have a filter cone with a LOT of grind in it, a conventional approach to that will have left the grind saturated with darned concentrated coffee. It'd be a shame to leave it there. But if extraction time is properly over, it'd be bad to toss in a last dash of hot water to flush it out.

So drop in some cold. It'll reduce the extent to which the grind has a "last hurrah" chance to introduce over-extraction as you're milking the last bit of brew from the grind.

It's just something to keep in your pocket in time of need. My preferred approach is to do several pours through poly, which means the grind has progressively less concentrated brew marooned in it with each pour.
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KillerQ
Senior Member
KillerQ
Joined: 3 Jan 2008
Posts: 146
Location: Madison, WI
Expertise: I love coffee

Espresso: Saeco Barista
Grinder: Capresso Infinity 565
Drip: Manual Cone Drip
Posted Fri Aug 1, 2008, 8:55pm
Subject: Re: Cold brewing coffee, unexpected benefits
 

Hey all,

   "cold brewing" is the only method I have not tried yet...  I think I may try the 'cheap' method described above....  I have noticed many different coffee to water ratios when brewing, however.  Is there a basic rule of thumb out there?  I would like to see those numbers first, then stray accordingly....

    For example, I would be interested in making a batch of about 4 cups (32 ounces) of coffee - I would rather not use the Gallon of water directions that I see in most places...


Thanks,

Matt!
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Jan_H
Senior Member


Joined: 15 Apr 2008
Posts: 37
Location: New Mexico, USA
Expertise: I love coffee

Posted Sat Aug 2, 2008, 9:43am
Subject: Re: Cold brewing coffee, unexpected benefits
 

I've used the Toddy Cold Brew method for more than 20 years. Also because of the low acid value. I use French Market (the red can), which is a coffee + chickory. The chickory actually absorbs some more acid as well. Give it a try, it only comes in one size can, but it is perfect for the Toddy.

I've been working on a way for people to try cold brew without purchasing the Toddy until they've tried the process. Cold brew just means you aren't processing the coffee with hot water. So far, what I've come up with is this:

8 cup french press
2/3 to 3/4 cup medium grind or drip grind coffee
3 cups +/-  tap or room temperature water (basically just fill the container with cool water to within an inch of the top, just like you would for press coffee)

Put coffee in french press container, slowly add cool water and make sure all grounds are wet. Do not stir coffee. Add top of french press. Slightly depress plunger so all grounds are just below the surface of the water. Set the press on the counter overnight, or for 12 hours. The next morning, push the plunger all the way to the bottom. Use 2 tablespoons (1 ounce) of coffee (concentrate) to 6-8 ounces boiling water (more or less according to your taste). You can store the press in the frig or pour it off into a large jar and refrigerate. I don't mind the stray coffee ground here and there, but if you want to, you could pour the mixture from the press through a coffee filter into another jar for extra filtration.

Now here's the neat thing about taking cold brew to work or traveling with it. You can get small bottles that are meant for shampoo and such for traveling. Fill one of these with the coffee concentrate to take along. It will be fine sitting on your desk all day without being refrigerated, unless you work in the sun, then keep it in a cool, dark place.

A lot of coffee "scoops" are 2 tablespoon measures. This is 1 ounce. I picked up a card with 2 plastic scoops on it for 96 cents at Wal-Mart.

So a small bottle of coffee, a 1 ounce measure, a cup and boiling water ... there ya go! However many ounces of coffee in your bottle is how many cups of coffee you can make while at work, or out camping.

I tried zapping an ounce of the cold brew in the micro to see what it would do for a cappa or latte. It doesn't taste like espresso, but it's not bad. It was pretty smooth-flavored in the cappa. Heated concentrate is basically what the Aerobie Aeropress does (which I also have) and they taste about the same too.

In any event, acid is a real bummer. So use a low-acid coffee from the start and it helps. And yes, you can make cold brew with ground decaf, too. Well, that's the try-it-before-you-buy-it method. If you really discover that you like the taste an effects of cold brew, then do check out the Toddy Cold Brew System, I believe it is called the Filtron in Europe, but it is not quite the same thing, there are a few more parts to the Filtron.

Toddy Cold Brew System
http://www.toddycafe.com/shop/

YouTube video on Toddy
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ba_CV7TlGsM
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AlanAdler
Senior Member
AlanAdler
Joined: 31 Dec 2005
Posts: 719
Location: Palo Alto, Calif
Expertise: Professional

Espresso: AeroPress
Grinder: Baratza - Virtuoso
Roaster: Fresh Roast SR-500
Posted Sat Aug 2, 2008, 11:55am
Subject: Re: Cold brewing coffee
 

Hi All,

I've often used a pH meter to measure the acid level of coffee.  AeroPress brewed at 175F consistently has one fifth the acid level of automatic drip brew and one ninth the acid level of French press brew.

Some people prefer the taste of AeroPress brewed at 165F.  I have not measured the pH of 165F brew, but it is surely even lower acid than 175F brew.  If you wish, I could easily perform this measurement.

A likely explanation for AeroPress brew at 175F having even less acid than cold- brew is that the AeroPress process is only wet for about a minute but the cold brewing process is much longer.

Finally, keep in mind that the darker the roast, the lower the acid.  This effect is quite substantial.  Roasting burns off the acid.

Best,

Alan
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Ramblin
Senior Member
Ramblin
Joined: 25 Jul 2004
Posts: 195
Location: Missouri
Expertise: I live coffee

Espresso: Aereo?
Grinder: KA Proline,
Drip: Melitta Clarity
Roaster: Iroast, SC/CO
Posted Sat Aug 2, 2008, 12:25pm
Subject: Re: Cold brewing coffee
 

AlanAdler Said:

Hi All,

I've often used a pH meter to measure the acid level of coffee.  AeroPress brewed at 175F consistently has one fifth the acid level of automatic drip brew and one ninth the acid level of French press brew.

Some people prefer the taste of AeroPress brewed at 165F.  I have not measured the pH of 165F brew, but it is surely even lower acid than 175F brew.  If you wish, I could easily perform this measurement.

A likely explanation for AeroPress brew at 175F having even less acid than cold- brew is that the AeroPress process is only wet for about a minute but the cold brewing process is much longer.

Finally, keep in mind that the darker the roast, the lower the acid.  This effect is quite substantial.  Roasting burns off the acid.

Best,

Alan

Posted August 2, 2008 link

Can you make an industrial sized one so I can make a weeks worth of coffee concentrate to keep in the fridge? (Just kidding)
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JVBorella
Senior Member
JVBorella
Joined: 29 Oct 2007
Posts: 1,166
Location: northeastern CT.
Expertise: I live coffee

Espresso: Speedster, Strega, Cremina
Grinder: K10 WBC, Bunnzilla
Vac Pot: Hario NCA 3 & 5, Mitzudash
Drip: Hario Wooden Neck/Buono
Roaster: Hottop KN-8828P/B
Posted Sat Aug 2, 2008, 1:37pm
Subject: Re: Cold brewing coffee, unexpected benefits
 

We have a Toddy & use the concentrate strictly for Iced Coffee as I prefer an Espresso or real Americano when I want hot coffee. We've been using Peet's Major Dickason's Blend in the Toddy most of the summer & it makes a killer I/C when combined with Half & Half. The standard recipe is 1lb coffee to 9 cups of water, let stand for 12+hrs for concentrate. After draining off the initial batch of concentrate I add 6C of water to the used grounds & let it sit for another 12-15 hrs. This batch is used undiluted except for the H&H.

 
John
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KillerQ
Senior Member
KillerQ
Joined: 3 Jan 2008
Posts: 146
Location: Madison, WI
Expertise: I love coffee

Espresso: Saeco Barista
Grinder: Capresso Infinity 565
Drip: Manual Cone Drip
Posted Sat Aug 2, 2008, 5:20pm
Subject: Re: Cold brewing coffee, unexpected benefits
 

Jan,

    Thanks a TON for the info.  I was just wondering about using my Bodum (Young) French Press to make Cold Brew in smaller batches...  I can't wait to try it now...

   I was thinking about using Starbuck's newer Pike Place Roast for the cold brew.  I found that Pike Place tastes A LOT better when I manual pour it at home than it does brewed at Starbuck's....  It's pretty dark to begin with, so it should be good....I'll report back.


On a side note, if the Toddy calls for 1lb coffee to 9 cups of water, then the above 3cup french press method would use about 1.5 cups to 3 cups of water (basing the idea that 1 pound of coffee is about 5.4 measuring cups of coffee)....  But that seems a bit toooo strong - so I'll stick with Jan's original recipe of about 3/4 cup of coffee to 3 cups of water...


Thanks,

Matt!
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Frost
Senior Member
Frost
Joined: 26 Jul 2007
Posts: 2,105
Location: Sierra
Expertise: I love coffee

Espresso: Isomac Venus
Grinder: Lelit PL53
Roaster: Poppery I w/variac, MET, BT
Posted Sun Aug 3, 2008, 11:10am
Subject: Re: Cold brewing coffee, unexpected benefits
 

I've been wanting to try cold brew for a long time, have a french press. The talk about low acid and mellow flavor has me thinking it might be good to try something zippy like a light roasted african to liven it up. (for iced coffee) How does this work out? What about post roast rest time? Is this brew sensitive to that? (I'm thinking 24 hour rest anyway)  Thanks for the reminder, I'm going to try a small batch of something  in th FP.
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KillerQ
Senior Member
KillerQ
Joined: 3 Jan 2008
Posts: 146
Location: Madison, WI
Expertise: I love coffee

Espresso: Saeco Barista
Grinder: Capresso Infinity 565
Drip: Manual Cone Drip
Posted Sun Aug 3, 2008, 11:16am
Subject: Re: Cold brewing coffee, unexpected benefits
 

I just did a 12 hour batch....  Came out great!  I used the Pike Place Roast....  Real Mellow!

So, what are some good recipes using this concentrate?


Later,

Matt!
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