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AnotherSadDrip
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Joined: 6 Feb 2013
Posts: 3
Location: KS
Expertise: I like coffee

Posted Wed Feb 6, 2013, 7:12pm
Subject: Water temperature, density, and mass
 

I have been struggling with the issue of water density for a couple of days now. I use a #6 filter cone and filter with a ratio of 66 g/liter--usually using either 33 g or 66 g of coffee depending on how large of a batch I am making. If I am understanding correctly, water has a lower density at higher temperatures. If I pour 1000 g of water at approximately 200* F, am I actually pouring less than 1000 ml? If so, is the difference negligible, or should I pour, say, 1004 g instead?
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JonR10
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JonR10
Joined: 26 Apr 2004
Posts: 10,376
Location: Houston, Texas
Expertise: I love coffee

Espresso: E61 Legend, Livietta,...
Grinder: Robur, B-Vario-W
Vac Pot: Hario Tabletop, Yama...
Drip: Technivorm
Roaster: 1-lb US Roaster, Behmor 1600
Posted Wed Feb 6, 2013, 8:00pm
Subject: Re: Water temperature, density, and mass
 

First, the actual change in denisty is not significant until you are waayyy to hot for brewing coffee.

Second, why not measure by weight instead of volume?  It's easy and always accurate.  

Third - taste is what's important.  
If the result is consistent and the coffee tastes good, what else matters?

 
Jon Rosenthal
Houston, TX
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AnotherSadDrip
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Joined: 6 Feb 2013
Posts: 3
Location: KS
Expertise: I like coffee

Posted Wed Feb 6, 2013, 8:32pm
Subject: Re: Water temperature, density, and mass
 

JonR10 Said:

First, the actual change in denisty is not significant until you are waayyy to hot for brewing coffee.

Second, why not measure by weight instead of volume?  It's easy and always accurate.  

Third - taste is what's important.  
If the result is consistent and the coffee tastes good, what else matters?

Posted February 6, 2013 link

Fair enough—taste is everything! As to your second point, I do weigh both coffee and water in grams, and it wasn't until I was reading about the SCAA's 60g/liter recommendation that I ever even thought about volume. (I keep getting hung up on this idea that the weight of 1 liter of water is going to differ at different temperatures. Honestly, I've just been a bit bothered by not being able to wrap my head around what seems like it ought to be a fairly simple math problem.) I am going to back to my old ways, as you suggest.
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JonR10
Senior Member
JonR10
Joined: 26 Apr 2004
Posts: 10,376
Location: Houston, Texas
Expertise: I love coffee

Espresso: E61 Legend, Livietta,...
Grinder: Robur, B-Vario-W
Vac Pot: Hario Tabletop, Yama...
Drip: Technivorm
Roaster: 1-lb US Roaster, Behmor 1600
Posted Wed Feb 6, 2013, 8:57pm
Subject: Re: Water temperature, density, and mass
 

AnotherSadDrip Said:

...and it wasn't until I was reading about the SCAA's 60g/liter recommendation that I ever even thought about volume.

Posted February 6, 2013 link

Well, it is a guideline rather than a rigid rule.  If you were to brew at 75°C then a liter would be 975g and at 100°C that liter would be 958g for roughly 1.7% change in mass (of course it would be much less of a change from 90°C to 95°C, my usual brewing range).

Personally, I brew around 50 to 55 g/liter in my presspot at work because that ratio usually tastes good to me. I do weigh grounds and water, but when I consider other uncontrollable factors that affect taste then it puts the ratio measurement into better perspective for me.   I shoot for a consistent ratio and temperature and then if it tastes strong to me I can usually adjust by adding a little room temp water at the end  ;-)

 
Jon Rosenthal
Houston, TX
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Netphilosopher
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Joined: 14 Jan 2011
Posts: 1,602
Location: USA
Expertise: Just starting

Posted Thu Feb 7, 2013, 10:04am
Subject: ...
 

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AnotherSadDrip
Senior Member


Joined: 6 Feb 2013
Posts: 3
Location: KS
Expertise: I like coffee

Posted Thu Feb 7, 2013, 6:51pm
Subject: Re: Water temperature, density, and mass
 

Thanks, guys, really helpful stuff. I had calculated approximately 4% difference in volume, which I might have been tempted to "fix", but after reading these posts, I can see why it's not worth it. Grams to grams it is, from here on out.
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