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Discussions > Espresso > blends > Oily beans  
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momv630
Senior Member


Joined: 24 Jul 2004
Posts: 28
Location: Wisconsin

Espresso: Expobar
Grinder: Ranchilio Rocky
Roaster: Gen Cafe
Posted Tue Jan 19, 2010, 1:29pm
Subject: Oily beans
 

I bought a 5lb bag of coffee beans from a local coffee shop. Turns out they are really oily. The oily beans have really done a number on my grinder (Rocky) and my Expobar. I can't seem to get the grind right and it spritzes coffee all over the place. I tried a non-oily bean and all is just fine. This may seem silly but is there anything I can do to get the oil off? Maybe mix it with a dry bean (?) I have a ton of coffee beans I can't use. :(
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Worldman
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Worldman
Joined: 16 Nov 2004
Posts: 1,820
Location: Pittsburgh, PA, USA
Expertise: Professional

Espresso: Expobar Office Control
Grinder: Cimbali 6/S
Posted Fri Jan 22, 2010, 9:10pm
Subject: Re: Oily beans
 

momv630,

Why, oh why would you buy 5# at one time form a local roaster? Your goal should be fresh roasted espresso. Many in here (and elsewhere) will buy in larger quantities to save on shipping costs as it costs less to ship per pound when you are shipping more pounds...but why get more than you need when you can simply go back in a week and get another pound?

I am assuming that the coffee is fresh roasted and you have not commented on this, and, I note that you say local coffee shop as opposed to coffee roaster.

Anyway, as far as getting the oil off the machine and out of the grinder, see here.

Len

 
Len
Len's Espresso Blends
www.lensespressoblends.com
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TrailRunR
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Joined: 7 Feb 2007
Posts: 76
Location: Western Massachusetts, USA
Expertise: I love coffee

Espresso: Rancilio Silvia w/PID (Past:...
Grinder: Mazzer Mini (Past: Baratza...
Vac Pot: Nope
Drip: None
Roaster: I wish
Posted Sat Jan 23, 2010, 6:33pm
Subject: Re: Oily beans
 

Worldman sort of asked the right question, but beyond that many "coffee shops" market coffee they don't roast. I have also found that if you go to coffee shop or even some that roast their version of espresso is the "oily bean" thing. These beans tend to be over roasted for my taste. Most of the premium espresso roasters do not over roast and the beans are not oily and will work just fine in most grinders and machines.

As far as mixing the beans, well that might be an option but think of how long it would take you to use them and what are you going to mix them with? Better to give them to a friend that has a drip machine or is used to DD and go get some good stuff. Chalk it up to experience.
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Iluvdabean
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Iluvdabean
Joined: 7 Mar 2005
Posts: 1,259
Location: Kentucky
Expertise: I love coffee

Espresso: La Nuova Era Cuadra/Gaggia...
Grinder: Baratza Preciso/K-A Pro...
Drip: Bonavita BV 1800 TH
Roaster: Nesco 1010/Behmor 1600
Posted Tue Jan 26, 2010, 1:13pm
Subject: Re: Oily beans
 

Hey people learn from their mistakes dont feel bad. Your not the first one whose done that. Live and learn...with the emphasis on learning.
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BSKIUSAF
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Joined: 27 Jan 2010
Posts: 17
Location: Clovis NM
Expertise: I love coffee

Posted Wed Jan 27, 2010, 2:37pm
Subject: Re: Oily beans
 

It is also individual taste. For the Espresso I like I seek out the oily dark roasted beans it gives me the flavor I am looking for.

Bill
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Worldman
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Worldman
Joined: 16 Nov 2004
Posts: 1,820
Location: Pittsburgh, PA, USA
Expertise: Professional

Espresso: Expobar Office Control
Grinder: Cimbali 6/S
Posted Fri Jan 29, 2010, 11:00am
Subject: Re: Oily beans
 

BSKIUSAF Said:

It is also individual taste. For the Espresso I like I seek out the oily dark roasted beans it gives me the flavor I am looking for.

Posted January 27, 2010 link

Bill,

It is, as you say, a matter of taste. You and anyone else are welcome to appreciate darkly roasted and/or oily beans.

I think that you will find that most in here (if I may be so bold as to speak for “most in here”) prefer a lighter roasted espresso bean as this preserves more of the coffee taste that we seek in drinking espresso as well as a complexity in the cup that simply can NOT be realized with darkly roasted beans. I find that real dark roasted beans always have a one dimensional taste – which some, admittedly, may prefer (though I most certainly do not). I have always assumed that Seattle’s Best & *$s over-roast their coffee to hide/mask that fact that it is not fresh. Indeed, it is pretty hard to find anyone at these two establishments who drinks a straight espresso.

Tell me, do you usually add sugar to your espresso? Do you usually drink milk based espresso drinks?

There is NOTHING wrong with you if you do either of these…I just think that it portends the required smoothing of the over-roasted (some would say smokey or burnt) taste that is not required if the beans are lighter roasted.

Lastly, in Italy where this all started, espresso is generally much lighter roasted than over here.  <  Though this needn’t be considered too much as I feel that the specialty coffee community has perhaps surpassed even my beloved Italians in the roasting and preparation of espresso.

 
Len
Len's Espresso Blends
www.lensespressoblends.com
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Big_Easy51
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Big_Easy51
Joined: 13 Feb 2005
Posts: 53
Location: Florida's east coast
Expertise: I live coffee

Espresso: Elektra MicroCasa...
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Drip: Presto Scandinavian Design
Roaster: Soon...very soon
Posted Sat Mar 6, 2010, 8:50pm
Subject: Re: Oily beans
 

" I think that you will find that most in here (if I may be so bold as to speak for “most in here”) prefer a lighter roasted espresso bean as this preserves more of the coffee taste that we seek in drinking espresso as well as a complexity in the cup that simply can NOT be realized with darkly roasted beans. I find that real dark roasted beans always have a one dimensional taste."

I beg to differ.  The old Black Cat was dark, oily, multi-dimensional, VERY complex, and delicious. It was great as a straight shot and held up well in milk drinks.  Coffee Geek used it as the coffee with which they tested espresso machines.

In Italy, the roast depends in part on where in the country you are drinking espresso.  There is a decided difference between the north and the south in terms of roast style.

My wife loves Metropolis Redline...and that is a very light-colored roast.  I prefer something darker and heavier (but NOTone dimensional).

 
"Coffee is not, after all, a matter of national security or life and death.  It is MUCH more important than that."
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baba
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baba
Joined: 23 Mar 2010
Posts: 57
Location: washington state
Expertise: Just starting

Espresso: Rancilio Epoca St1 -
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Drip: french press
Posted Wed Apr 7, 2010, 8:01pm
Subject: Re: Oily beans
 

Roasting your beans untill they are dark and oily is the sourthern Italy style of roasting.  Unfortunately when you over roast your coffee, you force the coffee sugars out of the bean, and you see oil.  Northern style espresso is roasted lighter - the coffee is almost dry looking, and the sugars stay in the bean.  The result is a sweater coffee, more of a roasted nuts flavor, with no bitterness.  
 If the coffee is dark and oily, it gets a burnt taste, and tends to be bitter.
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Big_Easy51
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Big_Easy51
Joined: 13 Feb 2005
Posts: 53
Location: Florida's east coast
Expertise: I live coffee

Espresso: Elektra MicroCasa...
Grinder: La Cimblai Junior
Drip: Presto Scandinavian Design
Roaster: Soon...very soon
Posted Mon May 17, 2010, 3:12pm
Subject: Re: Oily beans
 

baba Said:

Roasting your beans untill they are dark and oily is the sourthern Italy style of roasting.  Unfortunately when you over roast your coffee, you force the coffee sugars out of the bean, and you see oil.  Northern style espresso is roasted lighter - the coffee is almost dry looking, and the sugars stay in the bean.  The result is a sweater coffee, more of a roasted nuts flavor, with no bitterness.  
 If the coffee is dark and oily, it gets a burnt taste, and tends to be bitter.

Posted April 7, 2010 link

This has a lot to do with the skill of the roaster.  You are making a generalization here, and it is not always true.
Yes, some roasters heat the life out of their beans, and end up with a one-dimensional espresso.  But it is possible to roast beans so they are dark and oily and still sweet, with great complexity.  I have had espresso like this in southern Italy and in Sicily.  And believe me when I say they takes a back seat to no "light" roast.  

A big variable will be the temp and pressure of the shot being pulled.  The machine and the grind play a not insignificant role in the end result.  And the water used can have a dramatic effect.

Please don't make the mistake of thinking that just because the beans are dark and oily that they have been over roasted.  Many are, true.  But there are some stellar blends that blossom with dark roasting by a master roaster, and they are NOT over roasted.  The sweetness, nuttiness, caramel and chocolate, berries...all can be in evidence in a good dark roast.

 
"Coffee is not, after all, a matter of national security or life and death.  It is MUCH more important than that."
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rarebear
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rarebear
Joined: 13 Dec 2009
Posts: 213
Location: Rex. Georgia USA
Expertise: I love coffee

Espresso: Fiorenzata Bricoletta
Grinder: Mazzer Major
Vac Pot: Yama 8C
Roaster: Hot Top B2
Posted Mon May 17, 2010, 8:45pm
Subject: Re: Oily beans
 

Being a Noob let me get THE QUESTION.......

I know nothing of oily beans but I have learned that if your getting gushers grind finer and or change dose...
Different Beans different dose and grind..

I hope this helps..
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