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Mazzer SJ Voltage Conversion
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LaSpaz
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LaSpaz
Joined: 24 Dec 2009
Posts: 17
Location: New Zealand
Expertise: I love coffee

Posted Wed Jun 29, 2011, 1:45pm
Subject: Mazzer SJ Voltage Conversion
 

Does anyone have some knowledge of changing the voltage of a Mazzer SJ from 110v to 230v?

I know there has been discussion before on how the grinders run in other countries in regards to 50/60hz on how the grinder may run 20% faster or slower. I have a transformer to run the grinder as well as my Vivaldi on but was curious about changing the voltage of the Mazzer.

I would assume (perhaps incorrectly), that the motor is the same and very little is different between the 110/230v models? Or is the motor different and specific to the voltage? What parts would I need to exchange to switch over the voltage?

Just fishing to see if anyone knows and might lighten the load on my transformer!

Thanks!

Bevan
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pilot808
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Joined: 7 Sep 2005
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Location: Des Moines, Ia
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Espresso: La Marzocco Linea 3av
Grinder: Rio Super Automatic \ Rio...
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Posted Thu Jun 30, 2011, 11:30am
Subject: Re: Mazzer SJ Voltage Conversion
 

Drawing on my limited knowledge of electricity, it is possible to run a 120 volt motor on a 240 system utilizing one leg of the supply and the common wire, then having a dedicated ground on the appliance so as not to get shocked. But it will still run as it did on 120, no change in power or draw.

I don't think it works the other way though. (240 on a 120 circuit) I assume because of the difference in phasing?

Like I said "limited knowledge"

Bob
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PJK
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PJK
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Posted Thu Jun 30, 2011, 9:15pm
Subject: Re: Mazzer SJ Voltage Conversion
 

The best electrical document I was able to find on the SJ is found here:

http://www.espressoliquidators.com/MazzerSuperJolly.swf

This is not a schematic but rather a wiring diagram, so exactly how the machine works is not explicet.  It appears to be a two phase induction motor with the second phase derived with a motor run capacitor.

I am sure the 120 volt and 240 volt motors ars similar.  The 240 volt motors will have more turns in each winding of finer wire than the 120 volt motor. Also the capacitor will be a different value.

Expect the motor to run on 50Hz at 5/6 the speed that it would run on 60 Hz.

If you are running a 120 volt machine on 240 volt you will need a transformer.  Make sure the transformer has sufficent capacity the deliver the V / A specified on the grinder.  Just using the transformer should give satisfactory results.  If you want to optimise things you might try upping the capacitor by about 20%.

Phil



LaSpaz Said:

Does anyone have some knowledge of changing the voltage of a Mazzer SJ from 110v to 230v?

I know there has been discussion before on how the grinders run in other countries in regards to 50/60hz on how the grinder may run 20% faster or slower. I have a transformer to run the grinder as well as my Vivaldi on but was curious about changing the voltage of the Mazzer.

I would assume (perhaps incorrectly), that the motor is the same and very little is different between the 110/230v models? Or is the motor different and specific to the voltage? What parts would I need to exchange to switch over the voltage?

Just fishing to see if anyone knows and might lighten the load on my transformer!

Thanks!

Bevan

Posted June 29, 2011 link


 
Philip J. Keleshian
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