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Discussions > Espresso > Latte Art > crema quality...  
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emradguy
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Posted Fri Oct 5, 2012, 9:24am
Subject: crema quality for pouring latte art
 

Endo Said:

...you need a bit of time for the shot to settle and the crema to shrink if you want to do any good latte art.

Posted October 4, 2012 link

Can someone please elaborate on the crema quality needed to pour great art?  I've read many discussions on microfoam quality and do a decent job (IMO) when my microfoam comes out good, but always want to improve.

 
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ShooterMcGavin
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Posted Sat Oct 6, 2012, 5:16am
Subject: Re: crema quality for pouring latte art
 

I've heard a lot of people say that crema is necessary to produce great latte art, but on the other hand, I've seen some excellent latte art poured in non-espresso drinks like matcha green tea, chocolate milk, and even protein shakes... (I've seen a lady pour incredible art in chocolate milk...in a paper cup)

My guess is that crema is lighter than the espresso underneath so letting it "shrink" would allow the espresso underneath to provide a better contrast to the white milk?
Anyhow, I think steaming the milk properly is waaay more important than producing crema when it comes to latte art.

 
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Joel_B
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Posted Sat Oct 6, 2012, 5:50am
Subject: Re: crema quality for pouring latte art
 

Yeah I wasnt surE I understood that statement.  I've poured latte art in shots immediately after the shot was stopped and also after most of the crema had dissipated.  Both are possible and both can turn out well.  I will say they result slightly differently, but don't know I'd ever purposely wait foe crema to dissipate prior to pouring.
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Endo
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Posted Sat Oct 6, 2012, 6:10am
Subject: Re: crema quality for pouring latte art
 

As others have said, it can be done with both, but they will look different. If you want sharp leaf definition and contrast in a rosetta, you can't have macro bubbles in either your foam OR your shot. Both must be smooth and like velvet. Swirling the shot in the latte cup so the crema bubbles break on the cup walls helps a lot if your coffee is very fresh or your machine very bubbly ( like when using a bottomless PF).

Adding a small amount of foam first and then swirling, before pouring art breaks up bubbles and provides a more uniform background for the art foam as well.

If you just pour right away, you can still get art. Blobby art mostly (like hearts and hostas) rather than a fern with several leaves.
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emradguy
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Posted Sat Oct 6, 2012, 11:34am
Subject: Re: crema quality for pouring latte art
 

Endo Said:

As others have said, it can be done with both, but they will look different. If you want sharp leaf definition and contrast in a rosetta, you can't have macro bubbles in either your foam OR your shot. Both must be smooth and like velvet. Swirling the shot in the latte cup so the crema bubbles break on the cup walls helps a lot if your coffee is very fresh or your machine very bubbly ( like when using a bottomless PF).

Adding a small amount of foam first and then swirling, before pouring art breaks up bubbles and provides a more uniform background for the art foam as well.

If you just pour right away, you can still get art. Blobby art mostly (like hearts and hostas) rather than a fern with several leaves.

Posted October 6, 2012 link

I understand your points, and thank you (and the others) for answering.

Endo Said:

If you just pour right away, you can still get art. Blobby art mostly (like hearts and hostas) rather than a fern with several leaves.

Posted October 6, 2012 link

This part of the statement certainly hasn't been my experience at all.  I've always poured right away (other than swirling the milk briefly) and most of the time can get a very nice, although not as sharp as I'd like, rosetta with many leaves that even have nice "crema veins".  I'm going to assess my crema bubbles before pouring (maybe even swirl it too) - at least for a while - and see if that improves my edge sharpness.

 
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Spankee1670
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Posted Wed Nov 21, 2012, 10:09am
Subject: Re: crema quality for pouring latte art
 

Does the tempeture make a difference,if so where should it be at?
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emradguy
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Posted Wed Nov 21, 2012, 5:02pm
Subject: Re: crema quality for pouring latte art
 

there's a frothing guide under the "guides & how-tos" section  (on the green bar above).

basic milk temp "landmarks" are:

1) stretch until 100 degrees F, or slightly less
2) roll until somewhere in the 135-150 degree F range (depending on your preferences)
3) texture on the counter, then pour

 
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Coffeenoobie
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Posted Fri Nov 23, 2012, 3:05pm
Subject: Re: crema quality for pouring latte art
 

I will try swirling the cup before hand, I do use a naked so have lots of bubbles in my espresso.

 
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enotslim
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Posted Fri Jul 4, 2014, 5:41am
Subject: Re: crema quality for pouring latte art
 

When I swirl the espresso the crema tends to become more separated from the espresso below to the point that the "pallete" for pouring latte art becomes a disc of crema floating on a sea of espresso. Total disaster. Suggestions? Using bottomless portafilter. Thanks.
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