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Espresso: Lever Espresso Machines
When I raise the lever water drips.
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natalie68
Senior Member


Joined: 26 Jun 2010
Posts: 24
Location: montreal
Expertise: I love coffee

Espresso: LaPavoni  Europiccola Pro
Posted Sat Jun 30, 2012, 5:54pm
Subject: When I raise the lever water drips.
 

Hi,
English is not my first language so...

Ok I just bought a Europiccola Pro. I Love it!
But is it normal that when I  raise the lever at least on table spoon of brewed coffee gets in the cup.
I also tried to pull a dry shot (filter empty) and the water would flow, spit ans steam until the reservoir was empty....

Thanks

NatNat
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AndyPanda
Senior Member
AndyPanda
Joined: 12 Jul 2010
Posts: 769
Location: San Francisco Bay Area
Expertise: I love coffee

Espresso: Olympia Cremina, Various...
Grinder: Mazzer Major, Fiorenzato,...
Vac Pot: vintage Corey
Drip: AeroPress
Roaster: BreadMachine/HeatGun
Posted Sat Jun 30, 2012, 9:31pm
Subject: Re: When I raise the lever water drips.
 

Are you are saying the water drips as soon as you start to lift the lever?

Or are you saying that when you lift the lever to a certain point (a little more than halfway) water starts to flow and then will continue pouring water and steam while you are holding the lever up?

If the latter, that is the way it is supposed to work.  This is a sealed boiler and has steam pressure to force hot water into the chamber above the coffee.  If you just hold the lever up for 7-8 seconds, the steam pressure will force the water into the coffee and you will see some drips of coffee into your cup - even before you start to pull the lever down.  This is by design and is how it is supposed to work.

If you are getting a lot of coffee in the cup before you start to pull the lever down, then you may be grinding too coarse or dosing too low (not enough coffee in the filter basket).  Ideally you will hold the lever up for 7-9 seconds and you should just barely start to get a drip or two before you start to pull the lever down.
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natalie68
Senior Member


Joined: 26 Jun 2010
Posts: 24
Location: montreal
Expertise: I love coffee

Espresso: LaPavoni  Europiccola Pro
Posted Sun Jul 1, 2012, 4:38am
Subject: Re: When I raise the lever water drips.
 

I would be b) , it is halfway to the top that the water starts dripping. So everything is good. After I posted the question yesterday I tried some more shots  and with the good grind and tamp water doest drip anymore ( I guess cause of the resistance of the tamped coffee it wont go through).


Thanks for the quick answer.
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natalie68
Senior Member


Joined: 26 Jun 2010
Posts: 24
Location: montreal
Expertise: I love coffee

Espresso: LaPavoni  Europiccola Pro
Posted Sun Jul 1, 2012, 5:04am
Subject: Re: When I raise the lever water drips.
 

Oh and an other question, I dont own  a grinder, I bought 4X100 grams of coffee with differents moutures to try out I found one wich is pretty good, make good crema and  good shots. But I want to keep on working on this to improve my shots.
I'am not sure I want to pay more than 400$ Any suggestion? It seems that beside the Mazzer or the rancilio there is no "real" options. I like the look and the price of the Isomac.
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AndyPanda
Senior Member
AndyPanda
Joined: 12 Jul 2010
Posts: 769
Location: San Francisco Bay Area
Expertise: I love coffee

Espresso: Olympia Cremina, Various...
Grinder: Mazzer Major, Fiorenzato,...
Vac Pot: vintage Corey
Drip: AeroPress
Roaster: BreadMachine/HeatGun
Posted Sun Jul 1, 2012, 7:43am
Subject: Re: When I raise the lever water drips.
 

People say very good things about Baratza grinders.  Customer service is excellent. I don't own one so can't give first hand experience.

I think you start finding a few grinders in the $250 range that will give good espresso but the really good grinders are upwards of $400.

You can find a few grinders under $250 that will deliver good espresso grinds but the ergos - in particular static electricity causing grinds to fly all over the place and retention of grinds and noise levels etc. - tend to be poor on the cheaper machines.

Check out the consumer reviews here at CoffeeGeek - there are a lot of reviews by actual users.

There are also several forum members that can't resist buying up used Mazzers and cleaning them up (I'm guilty and have several - forum member Wayne just had four Mazzers jump into his trunk) and occasionally they show up in the Buy Sell Trade forum here.

You can frequently find a commercial quality (but large and commercial looking in your kitchen) grinder for $200-300 and easily install a fresh set of burrs for $50. These machines will run forever.    Baratza may look much nicer in your kitchen if you don't want the look of a commercial grinder.

There are lots of good brands to choose from beside Mazzer and Rancilio - Mazzer is the favorite around here (built like a tank) but many other grinders will grind just as well.
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IMAWriter
Senior Member
IMAWriter
Joined: 4 Jul 2002
Posts: 5,930
Location: Brentwood, TN
Expertise: I live coffee

Espresso: Bezzera Strega
Grinder: Forte, OE Pharos,...
Vac Pot: Adcraft SS, Yama 8 cup
Drip: Brazen, Kalita, Chemex,...
Roaster: Behmor 1600+, CO/UFO combo
Posted Mon Jul 2, 2012, 12:46pm
Subject: Re: When I raise the lever water drips.
 

Natalie, it is OK if you get a few drips with the lever full raised, especially after it is up a few seconds. This is part of the "pre-infusion" process. I hold my lever up at least a count of 8.
Don't forget, when the brew ready light goes out, to open the steam valve for 2 seconds, then close. You'll see the light go back on, showing that the boiler is now heating the water and machine to it's proper temperature. This is a must to get your first shot somewhat close to the proper temperature.
Most (as I did0 found the 2nd and 3rd shots were the best, as the La Pavoni quickly over heats. After a 3rd shot, soak your port filter in cold water till it's room temperature, insert into the group, grind your coffee, and your group head will have cooled just enough to get you back to a good temperature.

YES, You will get MUCH better results with a proper grinder.

A good vintage wooden manual grinder (I have 2, I paid $75 each, NOT selling!) does a great job.
Baratza makes a grinder called a Preciso, and it can be purchased refurbed for about $249US.

There are several vendors in Canada where you can purchase new, an one who can sell you a reconditioned one.
For Forum reasons, I can't publish his name, but will be glad to provide that information if you PM me. (send a private email.)

You have a great machine, capable of wonderful espresso. Just don't burn yourself!! :>D

 
Rob J (LMWDP #187)
My Music Production web site:
www.robertjason.com
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natalie68
Senior Member


Joined: 26 Jun 2010
Posts: 24
Location: montreal
Expertise: I love coffee

Espresso: LaPavoni  Europiccola Pro
Posted Sat Jul 7, 2012, 10:46pm
Subject: Re: When I raise the lever water drips.
 

I am pretty suprise to know that you use the manual vintage grinder, how do you get a fine grind with it? It doest take hours?
In Montreal a guy is selling an old Faema  grinder (squarish) and a commercial Cunnil do you know anything about those?


Thanks
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