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Signor Cappuccino CXE9
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Klmzugl
Senior Member


Joined: 27 Apr 2003
Posts: 1
Location: Kalamazoo
Expertise: Beginner

Posted Sun Apr 27, 2003, 8:26am
Subject: Signor Cappuccino CXE9
 

I received the above Espresso/Cappuccino maker without instructions, does anyone out there have a booklet they could copy for me or know where I could get one?  Is Signor Cappuccino still in business?  I could not find a listing for them or Coffee Imports of San Fran.

Thanks,
Gail
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crema_more_crema
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crema_more_crema
Joined: 11 Dec 2012
Posts: 1
Location: below the thumb
Expertise: I love coffee

Posted Sat Dec 15, 2012, 10:26am
Subject: Re: Signor Cappuccino CXE9
 

Text from inserts in the box:

Signor Cappuccino

What's the secret?

What's the secret to great Cappuccino?  It's in the steam!  Italy is the birthplace of that thick and inky beverage we cal Espresso.  It's made by forcing steam rather than water through the coffee grounds.  You cannot make it with your percolator, no matter how strong your coffee is.  To get the real thing, you need a machine that can exert enough pressure to push the steam through the coffee.  Signor Cappuccino does the job easily and best.  Fill the boiler with two (2) quarts of water, fill the coffee container with drip ground coffee and insert it over the boiler.  Place the lid on top and secure the restraining arm.  Then turn it on.  When the water hits the proper temperature, it will be forced through the grounds and out the central nozzle into a pyrex picther.  When nine cups have been made it will automatically shut off.  If you want to save coffee and make only 6 cups of delicious Italian espreso you may use the six cup coffee basket included in the box.  The side tube is for steaming cold milk for cappuccino.  Cappuccino is made by mixing steamed milk with espresso.  It's a wonderfully mellow brew.  And if you can add milk, why not brandy or liqueurs, or whatever other flavorings you may want?  Try your espresso many different ways and you'll see what a delightful and versatile drink it can be.

Interesting Recipes

The San Francisco Cappuccino
Espresso Coffee, Hot Steamed Chocolate, Brandy, Topped with, Hand Whipped Cream and Cinnamon.

The Ghirardelli Square
A Special Blend of Hot Steamed Chocolate, Brandy.  Topped with Hand Whipped Cream and Shaved Chocolate.

The Cafe Romano
Espresso Coffee, Brandy and Lemon Twist.

Cafe Vienna
Espresso Coffee, Brandy.  Topped with Hand Whipped Cream Float.

Cafe Irish
Espresso Coffee, Irish Whiskey. Topped with Hand Whipped Cream Float.

Cafe Kioke
Espresso Coffee, Brandy, Kahlua, Creme de Coca. Topped with Hand Whipped Cream Float.

Cafe Jamaica
Espresso Coffee, Tia Maria Liqueur. Topped with Hand Whipped Cream Float.

The Mexican Cafe
Espresso Coffee, Kahlua, Tequila. Topped with Hand Whipped Cream Float.

The Cafe Tuaca
Espresso Coffee, Tuaca Liqueur. Topped with Hand Whipped Cream Float.

Tuaca au lait
Hot Steamed Milk, Tuaca Liqueur, and Nutmeg.

The white nun
Hot Steamed Milk, Brandy, Creme de Menthe, topped with Nutmeg.

United States Distributor:  Coffee Imports International - San Francisco, California





Signor Cappuccino
For the Finest Espresso/Cappuccino
it's in the steam!


9 cups
CXE 9
MADE IN ITALY


Signor Cappuccino
For the Finest Espresso/Cappuccino
it's in the steam!

It was somewhere towards the end of the eighteenth and beginning of the nineteenth centuries that Italians started developing mechanized devices to prepare coffee at any time during the day, the fast "espress" way.

Towards the end of the nineteenth century appeared the first such machines and they were called espress or espresso coffee machines.

The first espresso coffee machines produced in a series appeared at the first exposition in Milan, Italy in 1906.  This was an important year in the history of coffee as such; it was the beginning of the era of exotic coffees made with pure essence of the coffee prepared instantly - the espress way - which originated th name "espresso".

By using espresso coffee as a base and lacing it with rich milk froth made with steam jets attached to the espresso machines, other exotic coffee drinks appeared under the name of "cappuccino", an Italian name for Capuchin monk.


IMPORTANT SAFEGARDS
SAVE THESE INSTRUCTIONS:

A) Always begin with the coffee valve (8) open before turning on the machine.

B) Make sure to close top lid (2) properly according to the following instructions:


  1. Place the top lid on the top of the tank.  Make sure the center tightening knob (5) is up so as not to make contact with top lid.

  2. Place lid locking arm (3) in position and tighten the smaller knob (4) completely down and as tight as possible.

  3. Then tighten the center knob (5) making sure it's centered in the center hole of lid and screw down as tight as possible.

C) Turn the machine off when process of brewing and frothing is complete to avoid any damage to the machine.

D) Never release the lid while machine is under pressure.  Open steam jet valve and coffee valve and wait until all the steam inside the tank and the coffee basket has escaped prior to removing lid.

INSTRUCTIONS FOR CLEANING:

A) This machine is for household use.

B) The safety valve (10) on the back of the machine must be periodically cleaned to be sure no calcareous deposits or any other foreign material are stored inside.  Proceed as follows:

Unscrew the plug of the valve (11).

Clean the inside.

Reassemble the various pieces making sure to check that the O-ring (12) placed on the small piston is not broken or defective.

PREPARATION OF ESPRESSO COFFEE

  1. Fill tank with cold water so that the water level comes up to the bottom of the inside valve (10) regardless of the amount of coffee desired.  Don't exceed this level.

  2. Fill coffee basket with finely ground dark roasted coffee.  Don't pack coffee but fill basket completely.  The larger basket brews 9 demitasse cups and smaller brews 6 or fewer demitasse cups of espresso.

Remove any grounds or foreign material from the rim of the coffee basket, as this may cause a steam leak.

  1. Place the top lid (2) on top of the tank.  Make sure the center tightening knob (5) is up so as not to make contact with the lid.  Place locking arm (3) in position and tighten the screw (4) completely down and as tight as possible.  Then tighten the center knob (5) making sure it is centered in the center hole of lid and screw down as tight as possible.

  2. Close the black steam valve on the side of machine.  Open the coffee valve on the top of the machine.  Turn the machine on and the red light will switch on.

  3. Place decanter under the coffee outlet.  The coffee will start pouring out from the valve when the water is sufficiently hot.  Leave the unit turned on until desired amount of coffee is brewed.  The total process takes about 12 minutes.

  4. Once the desired amount of espresso is brewed close the espresso valve and allow steam pressure to build.

    (Note - The machine will retain half of the water to create steam pressure).

  5. Espresso can be reheated or frothed with the steamer valve.

PREPARATION OF MILK FOR CAPPUCCINO

  1. While allowing more pressure to build, fill a picture no more than half way with cold milk or "half and half".  The picture size for best results should be 1/2 to 3/4 liter and ideally ceramic with a rounded bottom.  To check for adequate pressure, open the steam valve for a moment and close, if a fairly explosive jet of steam is released ther is enough pressure to begin steaming.  (This you will learn to judge by experience).
    (Note:  You can wait until some steam is released from the safety valve on the handle.  However, it is not necessary to build up that much steam, and if you do you should prepare to act quickly to avoid building up greater pressure).



  2. Dip the steam jet into the milk and open.  Steam will be forced through the milk, heating it and incorporating air.  There are tow ways to get a good head of foam:

a) The way to obtain the richest foam is to simply allow the entire quantity of milk to be strongly circulated around in the pitcher.  This is done by having the nozzle deep into the milk and having the pressure hight enough to fully circulate the entire volume of milk.  The process should be fairly quiet, making a "whooshing" shoud.  If loud sound is obtained like a jet entine, th pressure is not high enough for the given quantity of mild.

By the time the milk is hot a rich foam shou dhave formed.  By this method one can easily double the original volume of milk.

b) Another way is to open the jet into the pitcher and then lower the pitcher slowly and continue until a sufficient head of foam develops on the top of the milk.  Then thrust the jet deeper into the milk to heat the bottom.

This method will work in situations where the quantity of milk is too large or the pressure too low to really churn the milk around according to method (a).  It will not develop quite as rich or log lasting of a head of foam.

(Note - After removing steam jet from the milk, briefly open it again over an empty cup so that any milk that ha been drawn into the steam jet is blown out.  Failure to do this will result in milk deposits clogging the steam jets.

  1. Turn machine off after steaming process is complete.

RECIPE FOR CAPPUCCINO

There are three steps to making an espresso drink with foamed milk.  First, make the coffee, second, foam the milk, and third combine the two.  Never foam the coffee and milk together; such slipshod democracy would stale the fresh coffee and ruin the eye pleasing contrast between the white foam and the dark coffee.

To make the cappuccino pour about two ounces of espresso into a cappuccino cup.  Then add an equal amount of milk and top off with extra foam.  Sprinkle with ground chocolate or cinnamon.  If you wish to add liqueurs, do so before adding the milk.

SPECIAL NOTES

A) For Steam Only, fill the tank about half of its capacity of water, close lid and tighten coffee and steamer valves.  In approximately 8 minutes open the steam valve slowly to make sure steam is ready.  Then use as desired.  Hot chocolate, hot buttered rum, hot cider and mulled wine are excellent steamed.



INTERESTING RECIPES

The San Francisco Cappuccino
Espresso Coffee, Hot Steamed Chocolate, Brandy, Topped with, Hand Whipped Cream and Cinnamon.

The Ghirardelli Square
A Special Blend of Hot Steamed Chocolate, Brandy.  Topped with Hand Whipped Cream and Shaved Chocolate.

The Cafe Romano
Espresso Coffee, Brandy and Lemon Twist.

Cafe Vienna
Espresso Coffee, Brandy.  Topped with Hand Whipped Cream Float.

Cafe Irish
Espresso Coffee, Irish Whiskey. Topped with Hand Whipped Cream Float.

Cafe Kioke
Espresso Coffee, Brandy, Kahlua, Creme de Coca. Topped with Hand Whipped Cream Float.

Cafe Jamaica
Espresso Coffee, Tia Maria Liqueur. Topped with Hand Whipped Cream Float.

The Mexican Cafe
Espresso Coffee, Kahlua, Tequila. Topped with Hand Whipped Cream Float.

The Cafe Tuaca
Espresso Coffee, Tuaca Liqueur. Topped with Hand Whipped Cream Float.

Tuaca au lait
Hot Steamed Milk, Tuaca Liqueur, and Nutmeg.

The white nun
Hot Steamed Milk, Brandy, Creme de Menthe, topped with Nutmeg.




Signor Cappuccino
For the Finest Espresso/Cappuccino
it's in the steam!

It was somewhere towards the end of the eighteenth and beginning of the nineteenth centuries that Italians started developing mechanized devices to prepare coffee at any time during the day, the fast "espress" way.

Towards the end of the nineteenth century appeared the first such machines and they were called espress or espresso coffee machines.

The first espresso coffee machines produced in a series appeared at the first exposition in Milan, Italy in 1906.  This was an important year in the history of coffee as such; it was the beginning of the era of exotic coffees made with pure essence of the coffee prepared instantly - the espress way - which originated the name "espresso".

By using espresso coffee as a base and lacing it with rich milk froth made with steamjets attached to the espresso machines, other exotic coffee drinks appeared under the name of "cappuccino", an Italian name for Capuchin monk.

PREPARATION OF THE ESPRESSO COFFEE

In the espresso process the water is forced under steam pressure through dark roasted drip grounds of coffee (Italian espresso or French roast) packed tightly into the filter basket.  This extracts the essence of coffee with out-releasing the bitter oils and residue.

PREPARATION OF THE MILK FOR CAPPUCCINO

There are three steps to making an espresso drink with foamed milk.  First, make the coffee, second, foam the milk, and third, combine the two.  Never foam the coffee and the milk together; such slipshod democracy would stale the fresh coffee and ruin the eye pleasing contrast between the white foam and the dark coffee.

Assume the coffee is made.  You can either foam the milk in the cups before you add the coffee, or in a separate pitcher.  Either way, fill the cup or container about halfway with cold milk (the colder the better; hot milk will not foam).  The steam jet is a little pipe which protrudes from the top or side of your machine, with a screw knob for opening or closing it.  When one is making coffee, one normally keeps this valve screwed closed, to maintain pressure.  On the tip of the steam jet are two to four little holes, which project team downward and diagonally, in little jets.  Open the steam valve just a crack before you insert the nozzle into the pitcher, to prevent milk from being sucked back up into the tube.

Heating the milk is easy; getting a head of foam is a little trickier.  First thrust the nozzle deeply into the milk.  Then open the valve a couple of turns, and close it again gradually until you get a strong, but not explosive, hiss of steam.  Now lower the milk container until the steam starts bubbling or hissing just below the surface of the milk.  If you have the nozzle too deeply into the milk there will be no hiss or bubble; if you have it too shallow it will spray milk all over the kitchen.  If you have it just right, a gratifying head of foam will begin rising from the surface of the milk.

After you have a good head of foam, feel the sides of the container to see if the milk is hot enough.  If not, lower the nozzle to the bottom of the container and keep it there until the sides heat up.  Never boil the milk, and always foam the milk first, before you heat it , since cold milk foams best.

If you get a few big bubbles, rather than the may tiny ones which go to make up a strong, stable head of foam, either knock the bottom of the pitcher on the counter or let it sit for a couple of minutes before you combine the milk with the coffee.  If the jet of steam is too weak to really churn the milk around, raise the heat and make certain no pressure is escaping through the coffee valve.



SIGNOR CAPPUCCINO

HOW TO MAKE COFFEE AND USE THE REMAINING STEAM FOR MAKING 'CAPPUCCINO' OR HEATING ANY DRINK

1) Fill coffee maker with water to the center of the inside valve regardless of amount of coffee desired.
2) Fill coffee basket with espresso coffee (fine ground, dark roast)
3) Place lid on top of tank.  Center it exactly to assure prefect seal.  Make sure there is no grounds or foreign material on the rim of coffee basket as this may cause a leak.
4) Close black steam valve on side of machine.  Open Black Coffee Valve on top of the machine.  Turn on machine.  Once machine is turned on the red light will switch on.
5) Place decanter under coffee outlet.  The coffee will start pouring from the outlet when water is sufficiently hot.  Leave unit turned on until desired amount of coffee is dispensed.  Total process take about 12 minutes.
NOTE:  For less than 9 cups use smaller coffee basket.
6) Once desired amount of coffee is brewed, close coffee valve, leave machine turned on to build up steam which you then use to make cappuccino.

PREPARATION OF FROTH FOR CAPPUCCINOS

7) Fill a carafe with cold milk or "half and half" to approximately half its capacity.  Immerse the tip of steam jet inside the cold milk and open the steam valve.  Rotate the carafe slightly as you release the steam thus causing the milk to become light and frothy.  Pour this mixture over the espresso coffee and you have created "Cappuccino", the Ambrosia of the Gods.

FOR STEAM ONLY

8) Fill tank with about half capacity of water, close lid as well as coffee and steam valves, turn on machine and in approximately 8 minutes open steam valve slowly to make sure steam is ready.  Then use it as desired.
9) For heating coffee use steam by opening steam valve.

WARNINGS

A) For a perfect and secure operation, it is important that the lid is well closed by screwing the closing knob tightly.  Before screwing this knob be sure that also knob on the stud is strongly screwed.
B) Turn the machine off when process of brewing and frothing is complete to avoid any damage to the machine.
C) Never release lid while machine is under pressure.  Open steam jet valve and coffee valve and wait until all the steam inside and the coffee basket has escaped prior to removing lid.
D) If eventually the safety valve, while using the machine, start exceptionally working and some steam comes out from this valve the coffee machine has to be controlled.
E) The safety valve on the back of the machine must be periodically cleaned to be sure no calcareous deposits or any other foreign material are stored inside.  Proceed as follows:
Unscrew the plug of the valve
clean the inside
               reassemble the various pieces controlling carefully that the rubber pointed cap is in order.
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JasonBrandtLewis
Senior Member
JasonBrandtLewis
Joined: 9 Dec 2005
Posts: 6,372
Location: Berkeley, CA
Expertise: I live coffee

Espresso: Elektra T1 - La Valentina -...
Grinder: Mahlkönig K30 Vario -...
Vac Pot: Yama 5-cup
Drip: CCD, Chemex
Roaster: No, no, not another...
Posted Sat Dec 15, 2012, 3:32pm
Subject: Re: Signor Cappuccino CXE9
 

OMG . . .

 
A morning without coffee is sleep . . .
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calblacksmith
Moderator
calblacksmith
Joined: 25 Nov 2007
Posts: 7,722
Location: Riverside, Ca, U.S.A.
Expertise: I live coffee

Espresso: ECM Vene. A1, La Cimbali M32
Grinder: Azkoyen Capriccio, Major
Vac Pot: 40s era Silex
Drip: Msl. Com. brewers
Roaster: gave it a try, decided no
Posted Sun Dec 16, 2012, 3:17pm
Subject: Re: Signor Cappuccino CXE9
 

JasonBrandtLewis Said:

OMG . . .

Posted December 15, 2012 link

UH, +100, at least I will give an A for typing all that out!

 
In real life, my name is
Wayne P.
Anything I post is personal opinion and is only worth as much as anyone else's personal opinion. YMMV!

Feed the newbs, starve the trolls and above all enjoy what you drink!
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Coffeenoobie
Senior Member
Coffeenoobie
Joined: 11 Dec 2011
Posts: 3,022
Location: PNW
Expertise: I like coffee

Espresso: N S Oscar
Grinder: K30 & Vario W
Posted Sun Dec 16, 2012, 8:42pm
Subject: Re: Signor Cappuccino CXE9
 

That is very nice of you to take that much time.  I hope you had a scanner and an OCR.

 
Coffeenoobie

Buying advice: GRINDER GRINDER GRINDER. Don't cheap out on the grinder.

My coffee treasure map...
Click Here (maps.google.com)

Oscar trick out: http://s156.photobucket.com/user/GandBteam/story/14231
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