Our Valued Sponsor
OpinionsConsumer ReviewsGuides and How TosCoffeeGeek ReviewsResourcesForums
Espresso: Questions and Answers
Predicting Grind Level Based on Bean Origin and Roast
Italian Coffee
Italian coffee beans, grinds and pods from Kimbo, LavAzza, Miscela d'Oro & Bristot. Qty. discounts!
www.espressozone.com
 
Not Logged in: Log In to Postlog in
New Topics updated topics   New Posts new posts   Unanswered Posts new unanswered  
Search Discussion Board search   Discussion Board FAQ faq   Signup sign up  
Discussions > Espresso > Q and A > Predicting Grind...  
view previous topic | view next topic | view all topics
Author Messages
KatieR
Senior Member


Joined: 13 Aug 2013
Posts: 8
Location: Madison, WI
Expertise: I love coffee

Posted Sun Aug 25, 2013, 5:21am
Subject: Predicting Grind Level Based on Bean Origin and Roast
 

Hi All,

I've read a bit about predicting the grind level needed for a shot based on freshness/storage of beans, temperature, and humidity. I'm wondering if the type of bean and roast level also have a dramatic impact. I home roast and this morning I switched from a Sumatra (med/dark roast) to a Guatemala (med/light roast) and had to move from a setting of 2a on my Baratza Preciso to a setting of 6a. I was surprised by the large variance and it took me two dumped shots before I got anything drinkable. Is there any way to predict this better in advance? The Guatemalan coffee was described as having tons of crema and thick mouthfeel (it did, yummy!) - would that be a factor?

Thanks for your input!
KateR
back to top
 View Profile Link to this post
Coffeenoobie
Senior Member
Coffeenoobie
Joined: 11 Dec 2011
Posts: 2,972
Location: PNW
Expertise: I like coffee

Espresso: N S Oscar
Grinder: K30 & Vario W
Posted Sun Aug 25, 2013, 12:27pm
Subject: Re: Predicting Grind Level Based on Bean Origin and Roast
 

I personally have found dark roasts require a finer grind than medium roasts.  I believe darker roasts shatter more and have more compounds roasted off.  I also believe, the lighter the roast the harder the grinder has to work.  I have not done testing- this is just my personal opinion based on what I have seen.

 
Coffeenoobie

Buying advice: GRINDER GRINDER GRINDER. Don't cheap out on the grinder.

My coffee treasure map...
Click Here (maps.google.com)

Oscar trick out: http://s156.photobucket.com/user/GandBteam/story/14231
back to top
 View Profile Visit website Link to this post
CoffeeLoversMag
Senior Member
CoffeeLoversMag
Joined: 10 Jan 2013
Posts: 218
Location: Seattle
Expertise: I love coffee

Posted Tue Aug 27, 2013, 7:59am
Subject: Re: Predicting Grind Level Based on Bean Origin and Roast
 

There are four basic grinds of coffee, the coarse, medium, fine, and very fine. Grinding can only be determined how long the beans are run in grinder. Coarse grinding will take 5-10 second to grind, medium will take 10-13 seconds, find grind will take 15-20 seconds, and very fine will take 25-30 seconds.

Grinding must match also to the brewing method for the best results. When your brewing method will require coffee ground for a longer period, use the coarser ground. In brewing for shorter period of time, use the finely grind coffee.

 
Did you know...? Dark roast coffees actually have less caffeine than lighter roasts due to the fact that the process of roasting burns off caffeine.
www.coffeeloversmag.com/theMagazine
back to top
 View Profile Visit website Link to this post
calblacksmith
Moderator
calblacksmith
Joined: 25 Nov 2007
Posts: 7,479
Location: Riverside, Ca, U.S.A.
Expertise: I live coffee

Espresso: ECM Vene. A1, La Cimbali M32
Grinder: Azkoyen Capriccio, Major
Vac Pot: 40s era Silex
Drip: Msl. Com. brewers
Roaster: gave it a try, decided no
Posted Wed Aug 28, 2013, 6:53am
Subject: Re: Predicting Grind Level Based on Bean Origin and Roast
 

UH, no, please disregard the above advice. Grinding is set by the distance between the burrs, not time that it runs. The coarseness is strictly a function of the distance between the burrs, not the "time" that the grinder runs. The only time that grinding longer will yield a finer "grind" is in a chopper type device that pulverizes the beans, not grind them. Choppers may be OK for spices but they should not be allowed to get near coffee, they do not grind the beans, they beat the beans into chunks and powder, not good for brewing.

With coffee changing day to day and even hour to hour, the fact that there is a large change between two different coffees and roast levels is not unusual. That you were able to adjust with only two sink shots tells me you have things pretty close and you have a good feel for your grinder and it's settings.

 
In real life, my name is
Wayne P.
Anything I post is personal opinion and is only worth as much as anyone else's personal opinion. YMMV!

Feed the newbs, starve the trolls and above all enjoy what you drink!
back to top
 View Profile Visit website Link to this post
brianl
Senior Member


Joined: 1 Dec 2012
Posts: 409
Location: Chicago IL
Expertise: I love coffee

Espresso: Gaggia Classic (w/PID)
Grinder: Baratza Vario
Drip: chemex
Posted Wed Aug 28, 2013, 6:58am
Subject: Re: Predicting Grind Level Based on Bean Origin and Roast
 

Coffeenoobie Said:

I personally have found dark roasts require a finer grind than medium roasts.  I believe darker roasts shatter more and have more compounds roasted off.  I also believe, the lighter the roast the harder the grinder has to work.  I have not done testing- this is just my personal opinion based on what I have seen.

Posted August 25, 2013 link

Really? I have found the opposite. My darker roasts are usually coarser. Must be some other variables i'm not thinking of right now...
back to top
 View Profile Link to this post
KatieR
Senior Member


Joined: 13 Aug 2013
Posts: 8
Location: Madison, WI
Expertise: I love coffee

Posted Thu Aug 29, 2013, 12:33pm
Subject: Re: Predicting Grind Level Based on Bean Origin and Roast
 

Thanks for all the input! It's good to know that pulling two sink shots isn't unreasonable - I wasn't sure how many it usually takes to dial in the proper grind level. I also just didn't realize I should expect such a wide variation in grind even when it's all for espresso. Guess I'm still getting to know my grinder :)

Too bad it can take such an effort to dial in the grind. Usually I roast a few pounds at a go and desperately want to try all of them the next day! And I hate throwing shots down the drain. All those "seasoning" shots after cleaning usually end up down my gullet :) (and even some of the crappo shots that should be sink shots).

So far my darker roasts (Brazil, Sumatra) have required finer grinds, and a more medium roast Colombian took a coarser grind. I'll see if the trend continues.
back to top
 View Profile Link to this post
view previous topic | view next topic | view all topics
Discussions > Espresso > Q and A > Predicting Grind...  
New Topics updated topics   New Posts new posts   Unanswered Posts new unanswered     Search Discussion Board search   Discussion Board FAQ faq   Signup sign up  
Not Logged in: Log In to Postlog in
Discussions Quick Jump:
Symbols: New Posts= New Posts since your last visit      No New Posts= No New Posts since last visit     Go to most recent post= Newest post
Forum Rules:
No profanity, illegal acts or personal attacks will be tolerated in these discussion boards.
No commercial posting of any nature will be tolerated; only private sales by private individuals, in the "Buy and Sell" forum.
No SEO style postings will be tolerated. SEO related posts will result in immediate ban from CoffeeGeek.
No cross posting allowed - do not post your topic to more than one forum, nor repost a topic to the same forum.
Who Can Read The Forum? Anyone can read posts in these discussion boards.
Who Can Post New Topics? Any registered CoffeeGeek member can post new topics.
Who Can Post Replies? Any registered CoffeeGeek member can post replies.
Can Photos be posted? Anyone can post photos in their new topics or replies.
Who can change or delete posts? Any CoffeeGeek member can edit their own posts. Only moderators can delete posts.
Probationary Period: If you are a new signup for CoffeeGeek, you cannot promote, endorse, criticise or otherwise post an unsolicited endorsement for any company, product or service in your first five postings.
Quick Mill Andreja
Best bang for the buck in E-61 Espresso Machines.  In stock, free shipping, 2 yr warranty!
cupandbrew.com
Home | Opinions | Consumer Reviews | Guides & How Tos | CoffeeGeek Reviews | Resources | Forums | Contact Us
CoffeeGeek.com, CoffeeGeek, and Coffee Geek, along with all associated content & images are copyright ©2000-2014 by Mark Prince, all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated. Content, code, and images may not be reused without permission. Usage of this website signifies agreement with our Terms and Conditions. (0.244874000549)
Privacy Policy | Copyright Info | Terms and Conditions | CoffeeGeek Advertisers | RSS | Find us on Google+