Our Valued Sponsor
OpinionsConsumer ReviewsGuides and How TosCoffeeGeek ReviewsResourcesForums
Espresso: Questions and Answers
Steaming milk
Espresso Makers
Premium stovetop espresso makers, electric moka pots, machines & accessories.
www.espressozone.com
 
Not Logged in: Log In to Postlog in
New Topics updated topics   New Posts new posts   Unanswered Posts new unanswered  
Search Discussion Board search   Discussion Board FAQ faq   Signup sign up  
Discussions > Espresso > Q and A > Steaming milk  
view previous topic | view next topic | view all topics
Author Messages
Tangodancer
Senior Member


Joined: 8 Jan 2014
Posts: 2
Location: rye
Expertise: I like coffee

Posted Wed Jan 8, 2014, 3:37am
Subject: Steaming milk
 

I am new to steaming milk. the threads I read recommend to steam till jug was at the point where it was just to hot to hold. I decided to be sure and get a thermometer for peace of mined but using thermometer and steaming till it reaches 140deg the jug gets far to hot to hold, is this normal.
back to top
 View Profile Link to this post
weebit_nutty
Senior Member
weebit_nutty
Joined: 26 Sep 2013
Posts: 233
Location: Los Angeles
Expertise: I love coffee

Espresso: Cremina 67 Lever,  LCM HX
Grinder: HG One, Forte BG
Drip: Mellita #2 cone
Roaster: jiffy pop
Posted Wed Jan 8, 2014, 4:17am
Subject: Re: Steaming milk
 

No.  Traditional thermometers are way too slow to react so by the time your thermometer hits the 140F mark you've already overshot.

The rule of thumb you mention works.   Too hot for the hand is certainly going to be too hot for the lips. If you want to calibrate your technique,  measure the temperature after you steam your milk.  That temperature is your actual drinking temp.  

The more you practice the more familiar you'll be with steam times per milk quantities and you eventually won't need to even rely on touch.
back to top
 View Profile Link to this post
Tangodancer
Senior Member


Joined: 8 Jan 2014
Posts: 2
Location: rye
Expertise: I like coffee

Posted Wed Jan 8, 2014, 5:52am
Subject: Re: Steaming milk
 

I was using a coffee milk thermometer to check temperature,  after using just the hand as a guide I used thermometer to check temp which indicated 100f.
I also checked milk thermometer again against a very accurate photographic thermometer which showed the milk thermometer to be 10 degrees out. on the cold side so 140 was 150f.
Think I will go back to the hand test.
back to top
 View Profile Link to this post
calblacksmith
Moderator
calblacksmith
Joined: 25 Nov 2007
Posts: 7,479
Location: Riverside, Ca, U.S.A.
Expertise: I live coffee

Espresso: ECM Vene. A1, La Cimbali M32
Grinder: Azkoyen Capriccio, Major
Vac Pot: 40s era Silex
Drip: Msl. Com. brewers
Roaster: gave it a try, decided no
Posted Wed Jan 8, 2014, 6:47am
Subject: Re: Steaming milk
 

I know the conventional wisdom is to do as you said but I have been using a thermometer for, well, years and my hand always "reads" too cool, I like to steam to 150 also, much warmer than your hand will allow.

I don't understand why in a hobby that values consistency, hard readings, ratios and other metrics that the subjective "feeling" in your hand is considered proper.

Even if the thermometer is 10 deg off, you now know it is and you can adjust accordingly, I don't see a problem but you are drinking the result, not me so do whatever you think is best. There is no "right or wrong" only personal opinions. YMMV!

 
In real life, my name is
Wayne P.
Anything I post is personal opinion and is only worth as much as anyone else's personal opinion. YMMV!

Feed the newbs, starve the trolls and above all enjoy what you drink!
back to top
 View Profile Visit website Link to this post
CoffeeLoversMag
Senior Member
CoffeeLoversMag
Joined: 10 Jan 2013
Posts: 218
Location: Seattle
Expertise: I love coffee

Posted Thu Jan 9, 2014, 7:25am
Subject: Re: Steaming milk
 

There is a way of determining the right temperature of steaming milk without bothering yourself of temperature gauge. Just hold the jug until the side becomes uncomfortable to touch. When you feel that the hotness canít keep your hands for more than a second or two then turn the steam wand off because it reaches already the just too hot temperature.

 
Did you know...? Dark roast coffees actually have less caffeine than lighter roasts due to the fact that the process of roasting burns off caffeine.
www.coffeeloversmag.com/theMagazine
back to top
 View Profile Visit website Link to this post
emradguy
Senior Member
emradguy
Joined: 31 Mar 2011
Posts: 2,744
Location: Houston
Expertise: I live coffee

Espresso: Duetto II; Twist v2
Grinder: M Major, 2 Macap M4s, OE...
Drip: Espro presses; Aeropress
Roaster: H-B "List of Favorites"
Posted Thu Jan 9, 2014, 1:04pm
Subject: Re: Steaming milk
 

calblacksmith Said:

I don't understand why in a hobby that values consistency, hard readings, ratios and other metrics that the subjective "feeling" in your hand is considered proper.

Posted January 8, 2014 link

When I first read this, I thought...yeah, good point (even though I'm a "hands-on" guy).  but, after giving it some thought.  We actually teach our senses to replace, if you will, some of our measuring devices.  For instance, the tamp pressure. Sure, we don't advocate a particular pressure, but we do advocate consistency...and how can one be most consistent? measure!  But we don't.  We measure on a scale a bunch of times, then try to do it the same every time thereafter.  (Yes, I know Wayne, you have a dynamometric tamper, but you're an exception)  Anyhow, we don't all measure every shot weight either...or use a tool that measures viscosity/clarity to determine "blonding".  Instead, we use our eyes and past experiences of taste to determine when the shot is done.  Many baristi don't measure the dose weight either. So, I say to Wayne's comment...yeah, it makes sense to measure pitcher temperature, though one can teach themselves the sensory cues to end the stretch and, subsequently, the roll.

 
.
Always remember the most important thing is what ends up in your cup!
back to top
 View Profile Link to this post
view previous topic | view next topic | view all topics
Discussions > Espresso > Q and A > Steaming milk  
New Topics updated topics   New Posts new posts   Unanswered Posts new unanswered     Search Discussion Board search   Discussion Board FAQ faq   Signup sign up  
Not Logged in: Log In to Postlog in
Discussions Quick Jump:
Symbols: New Posts= New Posts since your last visit      No New Posts= No New Posts since last visit     Go to most recent post= Newest post
Forum Rules:
No profanity, illegal acts or personal attacks will be tolerated in these discussion boards.
No commercial posting of any nature will be tolerated; only private sales by private individuals, in the "Buy and Sell" forum.
No SEO style postings will be tolerated. SEO related posts will result in immediate ban from CoffeeGeek.
No cross posting allowed - do not post your topic to more than one forum, nor repost a topic to the same forum.
Who Can Read The Forum? Anyone can read posts in these discussion boards.
Who Can Post New Topics? Any registered CoffeeGeek member can post new topics.
Who Can Post Replies? Any registered CoffeeGeek member can post replies.
Can Photos be posted? Anyone can post photos in their new topics or replies.
Who can change or delete posts? Any CoffeeGeek member can edit their own posts. Only moderators can delete posts.
Probationary Period: If you are a new signup for CoffeeGeek, you cannot promote, endorse, criticise or otherwise post an unsolicited endorsement for any company, product or service in your first five postings.
Italian Biscotti Cookies
Premium artisan quality Italian Biscotti cookies. Many flavors!
www.espressozone.com
Home | Opinions | Consumer Reviews | Guides & How Tos | CoffeeGeek Reviews | Resources | Forums | Contact Us
CoffeeGeek.com, CoffeeGeek, and Coffee Geek, along with all associated content & images are copyright ©2000-2014 by Mark Prince, all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated. Content, code, and images may not be reused without permission. Usage of this website signifies agreement with our Terms and Conditions. (0.251904010773)
Privacy Policy | Copyright Info | Terms and Conditions | CoffeeGeek Advertisers | RSS | Find us on Google+